Consent of the networked : the world-wide struggle for Internet freedom / Rebecca MacKinnon.

By: MacKinnon, RebeccaMaterial type: TextTextDescription: xxv, 294 pages ; 25 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780465024421 (hbk. : alk. paper); 0465024424 (hbk. : alk. paper)Other title: World-wide struggle for Internet freedomSubject(s): Internet -- Political aspects | Internet -- Social aspects | Internet -- Censorship | Freedom of information | World politics -- 21st centuryDDC classification: 302.23/1 LOC classification: HM851 | .M3327 2012Other classification: AP 18420 | CC 8400 | MS 7965
Contents:
Introduction : After the revolution -- Part I. Disruptions : Consent and sovereignty : Corporate superpowers ; Legitimacy -- Rise of the digital commons : The technical commons ; Activism ; Balance of power -- Part II. Control 2.0 : Networked authoritarianism : How China's censorship works ; Authoritarian deliberation ; Western fantasies versus reality -- Variants and permutations : "Constitutional" technology ; Corporate collaboration ; Divide and conquer ; Digital Bonapartism -- Part III. Democracy's challenges : Eroding accountability : Surveillance ; WikiLeaks and the fate of controversial speech -- Democratic censorship : Intentions versus consequences ; Saving the children -- Copywars : Shunning due process ; Aiding authoritarianism ; Lobbynomics -- Part IV. Sovereigns of cyberspace : Corporate censorship : New neutrality ; Mobile complications ; Big brother Apple -- Do no evil : Chinese lessons ; Flickr fail ; Buzz bust ; Privacy and Facebook -- Facebookistan and Googledom : Double edge ; Inside the leviathan ; Google governance ; Implications -- Part V. What is to be done? : Trust, but verify : The regulation problem ; Shared value ; The global network imitative ; Lessons from other industries -- In search of "Internet freedom" policy : Washington squabbles ; Goals and methods ; Democratic discord ; Civil society pushes back -- Global Internet governance : The United Nations ; ICANN, can you? -- Building a netizen-centric Internet : Strengthening the netizen commons ; Expanding the technical commons ; Utopianism versus reality ; Getting political ; Corporate transparency and netizen engagement ; Personal responsibility.
Summary: Google has a history of censoring at the behest of Communist China. Research in Motion happily opens up the BlackBerry to such stalwarts of liberty as Saudi Arabia. Yahoo has betrayed the email accounts of dissidents to the PRC. Facebook's obsession with personal transparency has revealed the identities of protestors to governments. For all the overheated rhetoric of liberty and cyber-utopia, it is clear that the corporations that rule cyberspace are making decisions that show little or no concern for their impact on political freedom. In Consent of the Networked, internet policy specialist Rebecca MacKinnon argues that it's time for us to demand that our rights and freedoms are respected and protected before they're sold, legislated, programmed, and engineered away. The challenge is that building accountability into the fabric of cyberspace demands radical thinking in a completely new dimension. The corporations that build and operate the technologies that create and shape our digital world are fundamentally different from the Chevrons, Nikes, and Nabiscos whose behavior and standards can be regulated quite effectively by laws, courts, and bureaucracies answerable to voters. The public revolt against the sovereigns of cyberspace will be useless if it focuses downstream at the point of law and regulation, long after the software code has already been written, shipped, and embedded itself into the lives of millions of people. The revolution must be focused upstream at the source of the problem. Political innovation - the negotiated relationship between people with power and people whose interests and rights are affected by that power - needs to center around the point of technological conception, experimentation, and early implementation. The purpose of technology - and of the corporations that make it - is to serve humanity, not the other way around. It's time to wake up and act before the reversal becomes permanent. -- From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HM851 .M3327 2012 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002149052
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HM851 .C45 2011 Always on : HM851 .F592 2014 The 4th revolution : HM851 .L358 2011 You are not a gadget : HM851 .M3327 2012 Consent of the networked : HM851 .P34 2008 Born digital : HM851 .R3633 2016 The seventh sense : HM851 .R44 2013 Infinite progress :

Includes bibliographical references (pages 251-281) and index.

Introduction : After the revolution -- Part I. Disruptions : Consent and sovereignty : Corporate superpowers ; Legitimacy -- Rise of the digital commons : The technical commons ; Activism ; Balance of power -- Part II. Control 2.0 : Networked authoritarianism : How China's censorship works ; Authoritarian deliberation ; Western fantasies versus reality -- Variants and permutations : "Constitutional" technology ; Corporate collaboration ; Divide and conquer ; Digital Bonapartism -- Part III. Democracy's challenges : Eroding accountability : Surveillance ; WikiLeaks and the fate of controversial speech -- Democratic censorship : Intentions versus consequences ; Saving the children -- Copywars : Shunning due process ; Aiding authoritarianism ; Lobbynomics -- Part IV. Sovereigns of cyberspace : Corporate censorship : New neutrality ; Mobile complications ; Big brother Apple -- Do no evil : Chinese lessons ; Flickr fail ; Buzz bust ; Privacy and Facebook -- Facebookistan and Googledom : Double edge ; Inside the leviathan ; Google governance ; Implications -- Part V. What is to be done? : Trust, but verify : The regulation problem ; Shared value ; The global network imitative ; Lessons from other industries -- In search of "Internet freedom" policy : Washington squabbles ; Goals and methods ; Democratic discord ; Civil society pushes back -- Global Internet governance : The United Nations ; ICANN, can you? -- Building a netizen-centric Internet : Strengthening the netizen commons ; Expanding the technical commons ; Utopianism versus reality ; Getting political ; Corporate transparency and netizen engagement ; Personal responsibility.

Google has a history of censoring at the behest of Communist China. Research in Motion happily opens up the BlackBerry to such stalwarts of liberty as Saudi Arabia. Yahoo has betrayed the email accounts of dissidents to the PRC. Facebook's obsession with personal transparency has revealed the identities of protestors to governments. For all the overheated rhetoric of liberty and cyber-utopia, it is clear that the corporations that rule cyberspace are making decisions that show little or no concern for their impact on political freedom. In Consent of the Networked, internet policy specialist Rebecca MacKinnon argues that it's time for us to demand that our rights and freedoms are respected and protected before they're sold, legislated, programmed, and engineered away. The challenge is that building accountability into the fabric of cyberspace demands radical thinking in a completely new dimension. The corporations that build and operate the technologies that create and shape our digital world are fundamentally different from the Chevrons, Nikes, and Nabiscos whose behavior and standards can be regulated quite effectively by laws, courts, and bureaucracies answerable to voters. The public revolt against the sovereigns of cyberspace will be useless if it focuses downstream at the point of law and regulation, long after the software code has already been written, shipped, and embedded itself into the lives of millions of people. The revolution must be focused upstream at the source of the problem. Political innovation - the negotiated relationship between people with power and people whose interests and rights are affected by that power - needs to center around the point of technological conception, experimentation, and early implementation. The purpose of technology - and of the corporations that make it - is to serve humanity, not the other way around. It's time to wake up and act before the reversal becomes permanent. -- From publisher description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

MacKinnon's (Bernard L. Schwartz fellow, New America Fdn.) persuasive book clearly describes the mechanisms-both technical and political-that governments and corporations use to curtail citizen's rights in the United States and around the world. She uses many real-life examples and anecdotes to illustrate the complex web of policy and technical infrastructure that allows governments and corporate interests to censor, surveil, and otherwise impede free expression and individual liberty. These encroachments on individual liberty are happening in a space where average people tend to think of themselves as passive users rather than active citizens. MacKinnon argues for citizens to empower themselves against these repressive forces by demanding that software companies and others shaping the technological landscape be held accountable. -VERDICT MacKinnon's book is required reading for anyone interested in global information policy. Both lay and academic readers will enjoy her clear prose and methodical approach. Anecdotes and real-life applications make the book accessible without sacrificing depth and insight. An important, timely, and persuasive rallying cry.-Rachel Bridgewater, Portland Community Coll., OR (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

MacKinnon, former CCN bureau chief in Tokyo and Beijing and now a Schwartz Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation, offers an engrossing look into the Internet's double-bladed power, which has bequeathed freedom of authorship for all those who are connected virtually and globally and, at the same time, impelled networked authoritarianism in the name of managing a country's information technical structure and legal governance. Calling for actions in a "constitutional moment," the author zooms in on many alarming practices of global dominance on the part of technology companies, practices that have--through strategically designed administrative structures--ensured compliance with local or foreign governments to impose censorship on web contents. MacKinnon writes in the style of news reporting, citing stunning details from cases like Google's dilemma in China, the role of social networking in the Arab Spring, and US policies regarding WikiLeaks's release of classified cables. Evidencing a deep concern that the corporate sovereigns of cyberspace have allowed governments to make decisions on the governance of Internet without the consent of Internet users, MacKinnon passionately calls for the establishment of an international standard to protect the public's right of free expression and access to information across societies. Summing Up: Essential. All readers. T. J. Zou University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Rebecca MacKinnon works on global internet policy as a Schwartz Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation. She is co-founder of Global Voices Online, a global citizen media network that amplifies online citizen voices from around the world. She is also on the board of the Committee to Protect Journalists and worked for CNN in Beijing for nine years. Recently, she was a Visiting Fellow at Princeton University's Center for Information Technology Policy. MacKinnon is frequently interviewed by major media, including the 'New York Times', 'Wall Street Journal', ' Washington Post', ' The Financial Times', National Public Radio, BBC, and other news outlets. She lives in Washington, DC.

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