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Consciousness : a very short introduction / Susan Blackmore.

By: Blackmore, Susan J, 1951-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Very short introductions: 121.Publisher: Oxford, UK ; New York, N.Y. : Oxford University Press, c2005Description: 146 p. ; 18 cm.ISBN: 0192805851 (alk. paper); 9780192805850 (alk. paper).Subject(s): ConsciousnessDDC classification: 153
Contents:
Why the mystery? -- The human brain -- Time and space -- A grand illusion -- The self -- Conscious will -- Altered states of consciousness -- The evolution of consciousness.
Summary: "Consciousness, 'the last great mystery for science', has now become a hot topic. How can a physical brain create our experience of the world? What creates our identity? Do we really have free will? Could consciousness itself be an illusion? Exciting new developments in brain science are opening up debates on these issues, and the field has now expanded to include biologists, neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers. This controversial book clarifies the potentially confusing arguments, and the major theories using illustrations, lively cartoons, and experiments. Topics include vision and attention, theories of self and will, experiments on action and awareness, altered states of consciousness, and the effects of brain damage and drugs."--Publisher's description.
List(s) this item appears in: Very Short Introductions
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
B105.C477 B58 2005 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002148690

Includes bibliographical references (p. 135-140) and index.

Why the mystery? -- The human brain -- Time and space -- A grand illusion -- The self -- Conscious will -- Altered states of consciousness -- The evolution of consciousness.

"Consciousness, 'the last great mystery for science', has now become a hot topic. How can a physical brain create our experience of the world? What creates our identity? Do we really have free will? Could consciousness itself be an illusion? Exciting new developments in brain science are opening up debates on these issues, and the field has now expanded to include biologists, neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers. This controversial book clarifies the potentially confusing arguments, and the major theories using illustrations, lively cartoons, and experiments. Topics include vision and attention, theories of self and will, experiments on action and awareness, altered states of consciousness, and the effects of brain damage and drugs."--Publisher's description.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Susan Blackmore has researched various forms of consciousness for over a decade and has recently published the first textbook on the subject (Consciousness: An Introduction, published by OUP-NY and Hodder and Stoughton). She is author of more than sixty scientific articles and forty bookcontributions, writes for several magazines and newspapers, and is a frequent contributor on radio and television, both in the UK and abroad. Her controversial bestseller, The Meme Machine (OUP 1999), has been translated into eleven other languages and has life sales of 17,800 hardback and 22,500paperback.

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