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National insecurities : immigrants and U.S. deportation policy since 1882 / Deirdre M. Moloney.

By: Moloney, Deirdre M.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chapel Hill, N.C. : University of North Carolina Press, c2012Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 315 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780807835487 (cloth : alk. paper); 080783548X (cloth : alk. paper).Other title: Immigrants and U.S. deportation policy since 1882.Subject(s): United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policy -- History | Immigrants -- United States -- Social conditions | Women immigrants -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States | Illegal aliens -- Government policy -- United States -- History | Deportation -- United States -- HistoryDDC classification: 325.73
Contents:
Women, sexuality, and economic dependency in early U.S. deportation policy -- Differential regulation : Interrogating sexuality in Europe, in urban America, and along the Mexican border -- Gender, dependency, and the "likely to become a public charge" provision -- Loathsome or contagious : immigrant bodies, disease, and eugenics and the borders -- Clash of civilizations : whiteness, orientalism, and the limits of religious tolerance at the borders -- Deportation based on politics, labor, and ideology -- Immigrants' rights as human rights -- Excerpts of major U.S. legislation pertaining to immigration deportation policy -- Aliens removed or returned, fiscal years 1892 to 2008.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JV6483 .M645 2012 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002150472

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Women, sexuality, and economic dependency in early U.S. deportation policy -- Differential regulation : Interrogating sexuality in Europe, in urban America, and along the Mexican border -- Gender, dependency, and the "likely to become a public charge" provision -- Loathsome or contagious : immigrant bodies, disease, and eugenics and the borders -- Clash of civilizations : whiteness, orientalism, and the limits of religious tolerance at the borders -- Deportation based on politics, labor, and ideology -- Immigrants' rights as human rights -- Appendix A: Excerpts of major U.S. legislation pertaining to immigration deportation policy -- Appendix B: Aliens removed or returned, fiscal years 1892 to 2008.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Clearly demonstrating that scholarly studies of immigration history can inform today's often heated social and political debates, Moloney (Princeton) focuses on the development of US deportation and exclusion policy over more than a century. She shows that efforts to define US citizenship through policies of deportation were not merely manifestations of changing attitudes toward people arriving from around the world. Rather, an important focus is how complex and ongoing expressions of race, sex, class, ideology, and other recurring concerns were deeply embedded in immigration policies that often worked together against individuals and groups deemed unacceptable as US citizens. Also valuable is how the book shows the variability of immigration enforcement at different levels of government and how it played out in diplomatic relations with other nations. Moloney skillfully uses specific immigration cases uncovered through careful research to personalize the human effects of government action. Her writing is clear, and she avoids the academic jargon that so often limits the appeal of such scholarship. An extremely helpful appendix summarizes the many federal deportation laws passed since 1790. This study should find a wide readership among scholars in many fields as well as policy makers addressing immigration issues. Advanced undergraduates will also find the book accessible. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. K. Piehl emeritus, Minnesota State University, Mankato

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