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Lordship and literature : John Gower and the politics of the great household / Elliot Kendall.

By: Kendall, Elliot Richard, 1974-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Oxford English monographs: Publisher: Oxford : Clarendon Press, 2008Description: xii, 301 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780199542642 (hbk.); 0199542643 (hbk.).Subject(s): Gower, John, 1325?-1408. Confessio amantis | Aristocracy (Social class) in literature | Social networks in literature | Social exchange in literature | Social structure in literature | Aristocracy (Social class) -- England -- History -- To 1500 | Power (Social sciences) -- England -- History -- To 1500 | Social structure -- England -- History -- To 1500 | Households -- Economic aspects -- England -- History -- To 1500 | Households -- Political aspects -- England -- History -- To 1500
Contents:
The great household and an economics of power -- The political economy in the late fourteenth century -- Service allegory: the great household in Geniuss confession -- Courtly love and the lordship of Venus -- Women as household exchange in Geniuss tales -- Justice and the affinity -- Retribution as household exchange in Geniuss tales -- Total reciprocity and the problem of kingship.
Summary: In a sustained new reading of John Gower's major English poem, Confessio Amantis (1390-3), Elliot Kendall shows how deeply the great household shaped the way Gower and his contemporaries (including Chaucer, Clanvowe, chroniclers, and parliamentary petitioners) imagined their world.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR1984.C63 K46 2008 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002183564

Includes bibliographical references (p. 266-291) and index.

The great household and an economics of power -- The political economy in the late fourteenth century -- Service allegory: the great household in Geniuss confession -- Courtly love and the lordship of Venus -- Women as household exchange in Geniuss tales -- Justice and the affinity -- Retribution as household exchange in Geniuss tales -- Total reciprocity and the problem of kingship.

In a sustained new reading of John Gower's major English poem, Confessio Amantis (1390-3), Elliot Kendall shows how deeply the great household shaped the way Gower and his contemporaries (including Chaucer, Clanvowe, chroniclers, and parliamentary petitioners) imagined their world.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elliot Kendall is Lecturer in Medieval Literature at the University of Exeter

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