An Afrocentric Manifesto : Toward an African Renaissance

By: Asante, Molefi KeteMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Hoboken : Wiley, 2013Description: 1 online resource (186 p.)ISBN: 9780745673691Subject(s): Africa -- Civilization | African Americans -- Race identity | Africans -- Race identity | Afrocentrism | Blacks -- Race identity -- AfricaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: An Afrocentric Manifesto : Toward an African RenaissanceDDC classification: 960.01 LOC classification: DT15 .A83 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
COPYRIGHT; Contents; 1 Introduction; 2 Ama Mazama and Paradigmatic Discourse; 3 Afrocentricity: Notes on a Disciplinary Position; 4 In Search of an Afrocentric Historiography; 5 Kemetic Bases: The Africanness of Ancient Egypt; 6 The Afrocentric Idea in Education; 7 Sustaining a Relationship to Black Studies; 8 Afrocentricity and History; 9 The Black Nationalist Question; 10 Race, Brutality, and Hegemony; 11 Blackness as an Ethical Trope: Toward a Post-Western Manifesto; References; Index
Summary: Molefi Kete Asante's Afrocentric philosophy has become one of the most persistent influences in the social sciences and humanities over the past three decades. It strives to create new forms of discourse about Africa and the African Diaspora, impact on education through expanding curricula to be more inclusive, change the language of social institutions to reflect a more holistic universe, and revitalize conversations in Africa, Europe, and America, about an African renaissance based on commitment to fundamental ideas of agency, centeredness, and cultural location. In An Afrocentri
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COPYRIGHT; Contents; 1 Introduction; 2 Ama Mazama and Paradigmatic Discourse; 3 Afrocentricity: Notes on a Disciplinary Position; 4 In Search of an Afrocentric Historiography; 5 Kemetic Bases: The Africanness of Ancient Egypt; 6 The Afrocentric Idea in Education; 7 Sustaining a Relationship to Black Studies; 8 Afrocentricity and History; 9 The Black Nationalist Question; 10 Race, Brutality, and Hegemony; 11 Blackness as an Ethical Trope: Toward a Post-Western Manifesto; References; Index

Molefi Kete Asante's Afrocentric philosophy has become one of the most persistent influences in the social sciences and humanities over the past three decades. It strives to create new forms of discourse about Africa and the African Diaspora, impact on education through expanding curricula to be more inclusive, change the language of social institutions to reflect a more holistic universe, and revitalize conversations in Africa, Europe, and America, about an African renaissance based on commitment to fundamental ideas of agency, centeredness, and cultural location. In An Afrocentri

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Molefi Kete Asante is Professor of African American Studies at Temple University.

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