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The prince / Niccolò Machiavelli ; translated and with an introduction by Harvey C. Mansfield.

By: Machiavelli, Niccolò, 1469-1527.
Contributor(s): Mansfield, Harvey Claflin, 1932-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Chicago, Ill. : University of Chicago Press, 1998Edition: 2nd ed.Description: xxxi, 151 p. : ill., map ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0226500438 (alk. paper); 9780226500430 (alk. paper); 0226500446 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780226500447 (pbk. : alk. paper).Uniform titles: Principe. English Subject(s): Political science -- Early works to 1800 | Political ethics -- Early works to 1800Additional physical formats: Online version:: Prince.DDC classification: 320.1
Contents:
Introduction -- Note on the translation -- Chronology -- Map -- Prince -- Dedicatory letter: How many are the kinds of principalities and in what modes they are acquired -- Of hereditary principalities -- Of mixed principalities -- Why the kingdom of darius which Alexander seized did not rebel from his successors after Alexander's death -- How cities or principalities which lived by their own laws before they were occupied should be administered -- Of new principalities that are acquired through one's own arms and virtue -- Of new principalities that are acquired by other's arms and fortune --Of those who have attained a principality through crimes -- Of the civil principality --In what mode the forces of all principalities should be measured -- Of ecclesiastical principalities -- How many kinds of military there are and concerning mercenary soldiers: Of auxiliary, mixed, and one's own soldiers -- What a prince should do regarding the military -- Of those things for which men and especially princes are praised or blamed: Of liberality and parsimony -- Of cruelty and mercy, and whether it is better to be loved than feared, or the contrary -- In what mode faith should be kept by princes -- Of avoiding contempt and hatred -- Whether fortresses and many other things which are made and done by princes every day are useful or useless -- What a prince should do to be held in esteem -- Of those whom princes have as secretaries -- In what mode flatterers are to be avoided -- Why the princes of Italy have lost their states -- How much fortune can do in human affairs, and in what mode it may be opposed -- Exhortation to seize Italy and to free her from the barbarians -- Appendix Machiavelli's letter of December 10, 1513 -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Index of proper names.
Summary: The most famous book on politics ever written, The Prince remains as lively and shocking today as when it was written almost five hundred years ago. Initially denounced as a collection of sinister maxims and a recommendation of tyranny, it has more recently been defended as the first scientific treatment of politics as it is practiced rather than as it ought to be practiced. Harvey C. Mansfield's brilliant translation of this classic work, along with the new materials added for this edition, make it the definitive version of The Prince, indispensable to scholars, students, and those interested in the dark art of politics. This revised edition of Mansfield's acclaimed translation features an updated bibliography, a substantial glossary, an analytic introduction, a chronology of Machiavelli's life, and a map of Italy in Machiavelli's time.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JC143 .M38 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002150050

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- Note on the translation -- Chronology -- Map -- Prince -- Dedicatory letter: How many are the kinds of principalities and in what modes they are acquired -- Of hereditary principalities -- Of mixed principalities -- Why the kingdom of darius which Alexander seized did not rebel from his successors after Alexander's death -- How cities or principalities which lived by their own laws before they were occupied should be administered -- Of new principalities that are acquired through one's own arms and virtue -- Of new principalities that are acquired by other's arms and fortune --Of those who have attained a principality through crimes -- Of the civil principality --In what mode the forces of all principalities should be measured -- Of ecclesiastical principalities -- How many kinds of military there are and concerning mercenary soldiers: Of auxiliary, mixed, and one's own soldiers -- What a prince should do regarding the military -- Of those things for which men and especially princes are praised or blamed: Of liberality and parsimony -- Of cruelty and mercy, and whether it is better to be loved than feared, or the contrary -- In what mode faith should be kept by princes -- Of avoiding contempt and hatred -- Whether fortresses and many other things which are made and done by princes every day are useful or useless -- What a prince should do to be held in esteem -- Of those whom princes have as secretaries -- In what mode flatterers are to be avoided -- Why the princes of Italy have lost their states -- How much fortune can do in human affairs, and in what mode it may be opposed -- Exhortation to seize Italy and to free her from the barbarians -- Appendix Machiavelli's letter of December 10, 1513 -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Index of proper names.

The most famous book on politics ever written, The Prince remains as lively and shocking today as when it was written almost five hundred years ago. Initially denounced as a collection of sinister maxims and a recommendation of tyranny, it has more recently been defended as the first scientific treatment of politics as it is practiced rather than as it ought to be practiced. Harvey C. Mansfield's brilliant translation of this classic work, along with the new materials added for this edition, make it the definitive version of The Prince, indispensable to scholars, students, and those interested in the dark art of politics. This revised edition of Mansfield's acclaimed translation features an updated bibliography, a substantial glossary, an analytic introduction, a chronology of Machiavelli's life, and a map of Italy in Machiavelli's time.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Niccolo Machiavelli was born on May 3, 1469 in Florence, Italy. He was a political philosopher, statesman, and court advisor. Starting out as a clerk, he quickly rose in the ranks because he understood balance of power issues involved in many of his diplomatic missions. His political pursuits quickly ended after he was imprisoned by the Medici family. <p> He is best known for The Prince, his guide to power attainment and cutthroat leadership. He also wrote poetry and plays, including a comedy named Mandragola. He died on June 21, 1527 at the age of 58. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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