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Africans in Colonial Mexico : Absolutism, Christianity, and Afro-Creole Consciousness, 1570-1640

By: Bennett, Herman L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, 2003Description: 1 online resource (289 p.).ISBN: 9780253109859.Subject(s): Blacks - Mexico - Mexico City - Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Africans in Colonial Mexico : Absolutism, Christianity, and Afro-Creole Consciousness, 1570-1640DDC classification: 972/.00496 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Africans, Absolutism, and Archives; 1 Soiled Gods and the Formation of a Slave Society; 2 The Grand RemedyŽ: Africans and Christian Conjugality; 3 Policing Christians: Persons of African Descent before the Inquisition and Ecclesiastical Courts; 4 Christian Matrimony and the Boundaries of African Self-Fashioning; 5 Between Property and Person: Jurisdictional Conflicts over Marriage; 6 Creoles and Christian Narrat\ives; Postscript; Glossary; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index; About the Author
Summary: ""This book charts new directions in thinking about the construction of new world identities.... The way in which [Bennett] integrates race, gender, and the tension between canon and secular law into his analysis will inspire re-examination of earlier studies of marriage in Latin America and the Caribbean."" -- Judith A. Byfield Colonial Mexico was home to the largest population of free and slave Africans in the New World. Africans in Colonial Mexico explores how they learned to make their way i
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F1386.9.B55 B46 2003eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=153385 Available EBL153385
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F1321 .S64 2009 Pistoleros and Popular Movements : F1376 .E377 2010 In the Name of El Pueblo : F1386.9.B55 B46 2003 Africans in Colonial Mexico : F1386.9.B55 B46 2003eb Africans in Colonial Mexico : F1391.O12 G837 2005 The Time of Liberty : F1392.A1 K389 2009 Race and Classification : F1392.A1 O337 2009 A Flock Divided :

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Africans, Absolutism, and Archives; 1 Soiled Gods and the Formation of a Slave Society; 2 The Grand RemedyŽ: Africans and Christian Conjugality; 3 Policing Christians: Persons of African Descent before the Inquisition and Ecclesiastical Courts; 4 Christian Matrimony and the Boundaries of African Self-Fashioning; 5 Between Property and Person: Jurisdictional Conflicts over Marriage; 6 Creoles and Christian Narrat\ives; Postscript; Glossary; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index; About the Author

""This book charts new directions in thinking about the construction of new world identities.... The way in which [Bennett] integrates race, gender, and the tension between canon and secular law into his analysis will inspire re-examination of earlier studies of marriage in Latin America and the Caribbean."" -- Judith A. Byfield Colonial Mexico was home to the largest population of free and slave Africans in the New World. Africans in Colonial Mexico explores how they learned to make their way i

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Bennett (Rutgers Univ.) relies on church records, especially marriage licenses and Inquisition prosecutions, to reveal aspects of the social and legal lives of Africans and their descendants, slave and free, in colonial Mexico. He begins by establishing the scale of the African presence, saying that Africans outnumbered Spaniards and that early New Spain's black population was larger than Brazil's. He notes, as others have, that Africans participated in the conquest and often served in an intermediary role, supervising indigenous labor and Hispanicizing the Indians. Bennett focuses not on work or living conditions, but on Africans' ability to manipulate power through their understanding of the law. Blacks, being Christians and thus considered "persons with souls," enjoyed certain rights. For example, the church granted them the right of conjugality, which superceded their masters' property rights. Africans, Bennett argues, took advantage of these limited rights to make lives for themselves. By manipulating the interstices between canon and property law, Africans carved out niches for themselves and made their lives better. This thorough study informs on a number of historical fields, including the history of slavery, diaspora studies, identity, Spanish imperial history, church history, creolization, and the Hispanicization of Indians. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students and faculty. S. A. Harmon Pittsburg State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Herman L. Bennett is Associate Professor of History at The Graduate Center, CUNY.</p>

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