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The Legacy of Nazi Occupation : Patriotic Memory and National Recovery in Western Europe, 1945-1965

By: Lagrou, Pieter.
Contributor(s): Winter, Jay | Kennedy, Paul | Prost, Antoine | Sivan, Emmanuel.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1999Description: 1 online resource (343 p.).ISBN: 9780511048111.Subject(s): Memory | Reconstruction (1939-1951)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Legacy of Nazi Occupation : Patriotic Memory and National Recovery in Western Europe, 1945-1965DDC classification: 940.55 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Series-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Illustrations; Diagrams; Figures; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Introduction; Part I Troublesome heroes: the post-war treatment of resistance veterans; 1 Appropriating victory and re-establishing the state; 2 Heroes of a nation: Belgium and France; 3 A nation of heroes: the Netherlands; Part II Repatriating displaced populations from Germany; 4 Displaced populations; 5 The challenge to the post-war state: Belgium and the Netherlands; 6 Pétain's exiles and De Gaulle's deportees; Part III The legacy of forced economic migration
7 Labour and total war8 Moral panic: 'the soap, the suit and above all the Bible'; 9 Patriotic scrutiny; 10 'Deportation': the defence of the labour conscripts; Part IV Martyrs and other victims of Nazi persecution; 11 Plural persecutions; 12 National martyrdom; 13 Patriotic memories and the genocide; 14 Remembering the war and legitimising the post-war international order; Conclusion; Bibliography; UNPUBLISHED SOURCES; PUBLISHED SOURCES; Index
Summary: This book analyses how France, Belgium and the Netherlands emerged from the Second World War. Pieter Lagrou offers a genuinely comparative approach, based on extensive archival research. Brilliantly researched and fluently written, this book will be of central interest to all scholars and students of twentieth-century European history.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D809.E8 L44 1999eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=201984 Available EBL201984

Cover; Half-title; Series-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Illustrations; Diagrams; Figures; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Introduction; Part I Troublesome heroes: the post-war treatment of resistance veterans; 1 Appropriating victory and re-establishing the state; 2 Heroes of a nation: Belgium and France; 3 A nation of heroes: the Netherlands; Part II Repatriating displaced populations from Germany; 4 Displaced populations; 5 The challenge to the post-war state: Belgium and the Netherlands; 6 Pétain's exiles and De Gaulle's deportees; Part III The legacy of forced economic migration

7 Labour and total war8 Moral panic: 'the soap, the suit and above all the Bible'; 9 Patriotic scrutiny; 10 'Deportation': the defence of the labour conscripts; Part IV Martyrs and other victims of Nazi persecution; 11 Plural persecutions; 12 National martyrdom; 13 Patriotic memories and the genocide; 14 Remembering the war and legitimising the post-war international order; Conclusion; Bibliography; UNPUBLISHED SOURCES; PUBLISHED SOURCES; Index

This book analyses how France, Belgium and the Netherlands emerged from the Second World War. Pieter Lagrou offers a genuinely comparative approach, based on extensive archival research. Brilliantly researched and fluently written, this book will be of central interest to all scholars and students of twentieth-century European history.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This sophisticated, reflective analysis compares how three countries occupied by Nazis in WW II--France, Belgium, and the Netherlands--coped with war memories and implemented policies for political and cultural recovery. Lagrou effectively blends traditional political history with research in government archives and on monuments and places of memory. The central common characteristic of these nations' war memories is that there were no heroes of glorious victories or fallen soldiers of gargantuan battles, but only victims and various degrees of resistance and collaboration. Although governments tried in each case to construct unified national memories through monuments, medals, and heroes of resistance, the actual memories were too splintered on ultimately individual levels of victimhood and resistance for unified response--except in the Netherlands, where the queen had refused to collaborate. In France and Belgium the deported and victims either of the occupation or of resistance governments were the dominant force; and government policies dealt primarily with the distress and damage caused by the Nazi occupation to the displaced, forced migrant labor, and the victims of terror and the Holocaust. The book is sometimes dense, but meticulous in its research and thoughtful in its conclusions. Graduate and research collections. ; Carleton College

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