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Empire and Revolution : The Americans in Mexico since the Civil War

By: Hart, John Mason.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2002Description: 1 online resource (722 p.).ISBN: 9780520939295.Subject(s): Americans-- Mexico-- History | Mexico - Relations - United States | United States - Relations - MexicoGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Empire and Revolution : The Americans in Mexico since the Civil WarDDC classification: 972.004 | 972.00413 | 972/.00413 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Imperial Ambition; I. THE RISE OF AMERICAN INFLUENCE, 1865-1876; 1. Arms and Capital; 2. Rival Concessionaires; II. THE DÍAZ REGIME, 1876-1910; 3. Ubiquitous Financiers; 4. Building the Railroads; 5. Silver, Copper, Gold, and Oil; 6. Absentee Landlords; 7. Resident American Elite; 8. Boomers, Sooners, and Settlers; III. THE YEARS OF REVOLUTION, 1910-1940; 9. Mexico for the Mexicans; 10. Interventions and Firestorms; 11. Crisis in the New Regime; 12. Nationalization of Land and Industry; IV. THE REENCOUNTER, 1940-2000; 13. Cooperation and Accommodation
14. Return of the American Financiers15. Mexico in the New World Order; Conclusion: Imperial America; Endpiece; Appendix 1. Partial List of American Landholdings and Ownership in Mexico, 100,000 Acres and More, 1910-1913; Appendix 2. Partial List of American Properties of More Than 100,000 Acres or of Special Significance, Derived via Government Portions of Land Surveys or from the Land Survey Companies, 1876-1910; Appendix 3. American Banking Syndicates Formed to Render Financial Support to Britain and Her Allies during World War I, September 1914-April 1917; Notes on Archival Sources
AbbreviationsNotes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z; Illustrations
Summary: The deep relationship between the United States and Mexico has had repercussions felt around the world. This sweeping and unprecedented chronicle of the economic and social connections between the two nations opens a new window onto history from the Civil War to today and brilliantly illuminates the course of events that made the United States a global empire. The Mexican Revolution, Manifest Destiny, World War II, and NAFTA are all part of the story, but John Mason Hart's narrative transcends these moments of economic and political drama, resonating with the themes of wealth and power. Combin
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F1392.A5H37 2002eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=223617 Available EBL223617
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F1391.O12 G837 2005 The Time of Liberty : F1392.A1 K389 2009 Race and Classification : F1392.A1 O337 2009 A Flock Divided : F1392.A5H37 2002eb Empire and Revolution : F1392.A5S37 2008 Cold War Exiles in Mexico : F1392.B55 Colonial Blackness : F1392.B55 L495 2012 Chocolate and Corn Flour :

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Imperial Ambition; I. THE RISE OF AMERICAN INFLUENCE, 1865-1876; 1. Arms and Capital; 2. Rival Concessionaires; II. THE DÍAZ REGIME, 1876-1910; 3. Ubiquitous Financiers; 4. Building the Railroads; 5. Silver, Copper, Gold, and Oil; 6. Absentee Landlords; 7. Resident American Elite; 8. Boomers, Sooners, and Settlers; III. THE YEARS OF REVOLUTION, 1910-1940; 9. Mexico for the Mexicans; 10. Interventions and Firestorms; 11. Crisis in the New Regime; 12. Nationalization of Land and Industry; IV. THE REENCOUNTER, 1940-2000; 13. Cooperation and Accommodation

14. Return of the American Financiers15. Mexico in the New World Order; Conclusion: Imperial America; Endpiece; Appendix 1. Partial List of American Landholdings and Ownership in Mexico, 100,000 Acres and More, 1910-1913; Appendix 2. Partial List of American Properties of More Than 100,000 Acres or of Special Significance, Derived via Government Portions of Land Surveys or from the Land Survey Companies, 1876-1910; Appendix 3. American Banking Syndicates Formed to Render Financial Support to Britain and Her Allies during World War I, September 1914-April 1917; Notes on Archival Sources

AbbreviationsNotes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z; Illustrations

The deep relationship between the United States and Mexico has had repercussions felt around the world. This sweeping and unprecedented chronicle of the economic and social connections between the two nations opens a new window onto history from the Civil War to today and brilliantly illuminates the course of events that made the United States a global empire. The Mexican Revolution, Manifest Destiny, World War II, and NAFTA are all part of the story, but John Mason Hart's narrative transcends these moments of economic and political drama, resonating with the themes of wealth and power. Combin

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This history traces the development of the symbiotic connection between the United States and Mexico from 1864, when American capitalists sought to improve Mexico's infrastructure and thereby gain access to both resources and markets. Under the rule of Porfirio Daz, Americans acquired significant assets, only to lose them during the revolution. Mexico nonetheless continued to be seen as a commercial opportunity. Hart (Latin American history, Univ. of Houston) traces this relationship to the present, building on his earlier works, most notably Revolutionary Mexico: The Coming and Process of the Mexican Revolution. Having spent 12 years researching this book, he brings to light sources not noted elsewhere. The title of this otherwise outstanding work is misleading in that it emphasizes those who implemented the macroeconomic and commercial relations between the nations; Americans in Mexico, e.g., ex-Confederates, Mormons, and even tourists, receive scant attention. Nevertheless, given its insights and the quality of writing, this work is recommended for both academic and public library collections. Daniel Liestman, Florida Gulf Coast Univ., Ft. Myers (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This is an extraordinarily important addition to the historiography of Mexico and the US. The strength and weakness of the work are its very size and thoroughness, thus limiting its appeal to Mexicanists. Hart's story of US penetration into Mexico begins just after the US Civil War and continues to 2000. In the beginning, Mexican liberals and their open-door policy gave cheap land, cheap labor, and government protection to exploit Mexico's bountiful mineral resources, which Hart (Univ. of Houston) meticulously describes. This period lasted until the Mexican Revolution of 1910, when US incursion took another form. Hart closes with the return of the neo-liberal policies that ushered in a new level of capital consolidation. A weakness is that Hart does not directly tie this penetration to events such as the Texas War (1836) and the economic invasion of the Rio Grande. Yet the strands are there; for example, Charles Stillman and the formation of his and other financial empires, which allowed US capitalists to incorporate Mexico into its world system. This highly recommended work is well footnoted and indexed and includes an excellent bibliography. Most levels and collections. R. Acuna California State University, Northridge

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