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POWs and the Great War : Captivity on the Eastern Front

By: Rachamimov, Alon.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2002Description: 1 online resource (272 p.).ISBN: 9781845206321.Subject(s): History | Prisoners and prisons, Russian | Prisoners of war | World War, 1914-1918Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: POWs and the Great War : Captivity on the Eastern FrontDDC classification: 940.472 | 940.47247 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 Becoming Prisoners of War; 2 The Hague Convention and the Treatment of POWs Mission and Omissions; 3 The Treatment of POWs in Russia; 4 In Search of the 'Good and Loyal Prisoner'; 5 The Emperor's Clothes The Austro Hungarian POW Relief Effort; 6 Imperial Identities and Personal Concerns The Perspective of the Prisoners; Index
Summary: Joint Winner of Fraenkel Prize for Contemporary History 2001, London. Winner of Talmon Prize, Israel, awarded by the Israeli Academy of Sciences. Although it was one of the most common experiences of combatants in World War I, captivity has recei ved only a marginal place in the collective memory of the Great War and has seemed unimportant compared with the experiences of soldiers on the Western Front. Yet this book, focusing on POWs on the Eastern Front, reveals a different picture of the Wa r and the human misery it produced. During four years of fighting, approximately 8.5 million soldier
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Contents; List of Abbreviations; Introduction; 1 Becoming Prisoners of War; 2 The Hague Convention and the Treatment of POWs Mission and Omissions; 3 The Treatment of POWs in Russia; 4 In Search of the 'Good and Loyal Prisoner'; 5 The Emperor's Clothes The Austro Hungarian POW Relief Effort; 6 Imperial Identities and Personal Concerns The Perspective of the Prisoners; Index

Joint Winner of Fraenkel Prize for Contemporary History 2001, London. Winner of Talmon Prize, Israel, awarded by the Israeli Academy of Sciences. Although it was one of the most common experiences of combatants in World War I, captivity has recei ved only a marginal place in the collective memory of the Great War and has seemed unimportant compared with the experiences of soldiers on the Western Front. Yet this book, focusing on POWs on the Eastern Front, reveals a different picture of the Wa r and the human misery it produced. During four years of fighting, approximately 8.5 million soldier

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

During WW I, mobility and mass captivity marked warfare on the eastern front, much as stalemate and staggering mortality characterized the western front. One in eight Austro-Hungarian veterans had been a prisoner, which makes imprisonment a useful window for evaluating identity politics and belligerent relations on the eastern front. Rachamimov (Univ. of Tel Aviv) employs primary sources from Vienna and Moscow archives, including the POW Censorship. Challenging Peter Pastor and Omer Bartov, who argue that the Great War ushered in a totalitarian or genocidal era, Rachamimov finds that the two most lethal sites of captivity, Totskoye and the Murman Railway, did not anticipate Soviet or Nazi camps. He corrects traditional, officer-biased accounts of captivity with letters culled from the vastly more numerous lower ranks. Challenging threads in Austrian historiography that question surrender motives, he finds that most POWs, including "disaffected" minorities, remained loyal to what they saw as an uncaring homeland. On their return in 1918, they faced degrading proceedings intended to prove their loyalty to the state. The sufferings of POWs on the eastern front never captured the public's imagination as did the quagmire on the western front. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and collections. J. R. White American University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Alon Rachamimov Lecturer in Modern European History,Tel Aviv University, Israel

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