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Death of a Generation : How the Assassinations of Diem and JFK Prolonged the Vietnam War

By: Jones, Howard.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2003Description: 1 online resource (593 p.).ISBN: 9780198021971.Subject(s): Kennedy, John F | Vietnam War, 1961-1975Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Death of a Generation : How the Assassinations of Diem and JFK Prolonged the Vietnam WarDDC classification: 959.7043 | 959.70431 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; Introduction: Toward a Tragedy; 1 Counterinsurgency in South Vietnam: Averting a Quagmire; 2 Democracy at Bay: Diem as Mandarin; 3 Counteraction to Counterinsurgency: The Military Solution; 4 Waging a Secret War; 5 Subterfuge in the Delta; 6 The Strange Seduction of Vietnam; 7 A Decent Veil of Hypocrisy; 8 De-Americanizing the Secret War; 9 From Escalation to Disengagement; 10 End of the Tunnel? A Comprehensive Plan for South Vietnam; 11 Mandate from Heaven? The Buddhist Crisis and the Demise of De-escalation; 12 The Fire This Time
13 The Road to a Coup14 At the Brink of a Coup-Again; 15 Toward a Partial Withdrawal; 16 President Kennedy's Decision to Withdraw; 17 Fall of the House of Ngo; Conclusion: The Tragedy of JFK; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The assassination of John F. Kennedy led to the ""death of a generation"". The president had planned to withdraw all special forces by the end of 1965. But White House involvement in the Coup undercut the withdrawal effort and ultimately led to the war that Kennedy had sought to prevent.
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DS557.7 .J67 2003eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=271285 Available EBL271285

Contents; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; Introduction: Toward a Tragedy; 1 Counterinsurgency in South Vietnam: Averting a Quagmire; 2 Democracy at Bay: Diem as Mandarin; 3 Counteraction to Counterinsurgency: The Military Solution; 4 Waging a Secret War; 5 Subterfuge in the Delta; 6 The Strange Seduction of Vietnam; 7 A Decent Veil of Hypocrisy; 8 De-Americanizing the Secret War; 9 From Escalation to Disengagement; 10 End of the Tunnel? A Comprehensive Plan for South Vietnam; 11 Mandate from Heaven? The Buddhist Crisis and the Demise of De-escalation; 12 The Fire This Time

13 The Road to a Coup14 At the Brink of a Coup-Again; 15 Toward a Partial Withdrawal; 16 President Kennedy's Decision to Withdraw; 17 Fall of the House of Ngo; Conclusion: The Tragedy of JFK; Notes; Bibliography; Index

The assassination of John F. Kennedy led to the ""death of a generation"". The president had planned to withdraw all special forces by the end of 1965. But White House involvement in the Coup undercut the withdrawal effort and ultimately led to the war that Kennedy had sought to prevent.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The assassination of John Kennedy in 1963 created one of the great might-have-been debates in US history. Although Lyndon Johnson clearly bears the primary responsibility for US involvement in Vietnam, most historians have also emphasized Kennedy's role in laying the foundation for Johnson's decisions. For many years, however, some individuals (most famously, Oliver Stone in his movie JFK) have argued that before he was killed, Kennedy was preparing to deescalate US involvement in Vietnam. In the past decade, several scholars have begun to argue this position more insistently. This exhaustively detailed book is the culmination of that trend. Jones (Univ. of Alabama) argues that Kennedy would indeed have withdrawn from Vietnam, but that he also supported a coup against South Vietnam's leader, Diem, to facilitate the process, a move that tragically backfired. It is foolish to call any work about the Vietnam War definitive, but Jones does effect a shift in the balance of the argument and leaves the ball now squarely in the court of those on the other side of the debate. This is an important, persuasive book about a significant topic. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels and collections. K. Blaser Wayne State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Howard Jones is University Research Professor in the Department of History at the University of Alabama. He is the author of Mutiny on the Amistad (OUP 1997), Abraham Lincoln and a New Birth of Freedom, and Crucible of Power.

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