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Joining Places : Slave Neighborhoods in the Old South

By: Kaye, Anthony E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2007Description: 1 online resource (376 p.).ISBN: 9780807877609.Subject(s): African American neighborhoods | Community life | History | Neighborhood | Slaves | Social conditions | Social life and customsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Joining Places : Slave Neighborhoods in the Old SouthDDC classification: 307.336208996073076226 LOC classification: E445.M6K29 2007Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Neighborhoods; 2 Intimate Relations; 3 Divisions of Labor; 4 Terrains of Struggle; 5 Beyond Neighborhood; 6 War and Emancipation; Epilogue; Appendix: Population, Land, and Labor; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In this new interpretation of antebellum slavery, Anthony Kaye offers a vivid portrait of slaves transforming adjoining plantations into slave neighborhoods. He describes men and women opening paths from their owners' plantations to adjacent farms to go courting and take spouses, to work, to run away, and to otherwise contend with owners and their agents. In the course of cultivating family ties, forging alliances, working, socializing, and storytelling, slaves fashioned their neighborhoods into the locus of slave society.Joining Places is the first book about slavery to use the
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E445.M6K29 2007 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=361347 Available EBL361347

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 Neighborhoods; 2 Intimate Relations; 3 Divisions of Labor; 4 Terrains of Struggle; 5 Beyond Neighborhood; 6 War and Emancipation; Epilogue; Appendix: Population, Land, and Labor; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In this new interpretation of antebellum slavery, Anthony Kaye offers a vivid portrait of slaves transforming adjoining plantations into slave neighborhoods. He describes men and women opening paths from their owners' plantations to adjacent farms to go courting and take spouses, to work, to run away, and to otherwise contend with owners and their agents. In the course of cultivating family ties, forging alliances, working, socializing, and storytelling, slaves fashioned their neighborhoods into the locus of slave society.Joining Places is the first book about slavery to use the

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Kaye's study of slave neighborhoods focuses on plantations primarily in the Natchez District of Mississippi, which was in the southwestern Mississippi River delta region of that state. The author employs Anthony Giddon's theory of structuration to explain how neighborhoods developed among the slaves in this area. He presents ideas about slave marriages, resistance, independent production, paternalism, autonomy, and the slave community. The book is organized into chapters on neighborhoods, intimate relations, divisions of labor, terrains of struggle, "beyond neighborhood," and war and emancipation. An epilogue outlines the gradual evolution of black neighborhoods during Reconstruction. Kaye (Pennsylvania State Univ.) describes men and women opening paths from their owners' plantations to adjacent farms to go courting, to work, and to run away. He uses the familiar primary sources on slavery such as the Works Progress Administration interviews with ex-slaves, plantation journals, newspapers, county court cases, traveling diaries, and the records of the Southern Claims Commission. He also consults a heretofore-neglected source of testimony from the newly freed slaves: the US Pensions Bureau files of African American soldiers who served in the Union Army during the Civil War. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. E. M. Thomas Gordon College

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