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Antebellum Slave Narratives : Cultural and Political Expressions of Africa

By: Archer, Jermaine O.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in American Popular History and Culture: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2008Description: 1 online resource (143 p.).ISBN: 9780203881682.Subject(s): Africa - In literature | Africa - Politics and government | Africa - Social life and customs | American literature - African American authors - History and criticism | Pan-Africanism in literature | Slave narratives - United States - History and criticism | Slave narrativesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Antebellum Slave Narratives : Cultural and Political Expressions of AfricaDDC classification: 306.3/62092 | 306.3620922 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Book Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1 "Speaking Guinea and a Mixture of Everything Else": The Slave Narratives of Frederick Douglass Revisited; 2 William Wells Brown: Subtle Whispers of Slave Culture, Pan-Africanism, and Insurgency; 3 "Moses Is Got De Charm": Harriet Tubman's Mosaic Persona; 4 Harriet Jacobs: A Larger Discussion of the John Kuner Parade and Other Cultural Recollections; 5 Discourse on the Slave Narrative and a New Interpretation of Black Anti-Slavery Ideology; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Though America experienced an increase in a native-born population and an emerging African-American identity throughout the nineteenth century, African culture did not necessarily dissipate with each passing decade. Archer examines the slave narratives of four key members of the abolitionist movement-Frederick Douglass, William Wells Brown, Harriet Tubman and Harriet Jacobs-revealing how these highly visible proponents of the antislavery cause were able to creatively engage and at times overcome the cultural biases of their listening and reading audiences. When engaged in public sphere disc
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E444.A73 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=380817 Available EBL380817

Book Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1 "Speaking Guinea and a Mixture of Everything Else": The Slave Narratives of Frederick Douglass Revisited; 2 William Wells Brown: Subtle Whispers of Slave Culture, Pan-Africanism, and Insurgency; 3 "Moses Is Got De Charm": Harriet Tubman's Mosaic Persona; 4 Harriet Jacobs: A Larger Discussion of the John Kuner Parade and Other Cultural Recollections; 5 Discourse on the Slave Narrative and a New Interpretation of Black Anti-Slavery Ideology; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Though America experienced an increase in a native-born population and an emerging African-American identity throughout the nineteenth century, African culture did not necessarily dissipate with each passing decade. Archer examines the slave narratives of four key members of the abolitionist movement-Frederick Douglass, William Wells Brown, Harriet Tubman and Harriet Jacobs-revealing how these highly visible proponents of the antislavery cause were able to creatively engage and at times overcome the cultural biases of their listening and reading audiences. When engaged in public sphere disc

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Jermaine Archer is an Assistant Professor of History in the American Studies Department at SUNY, College at Old Westbury. His essay "Bitter Herbs and a Lock of Hair: Recollections of Africa in Slave Narratives of the Garrisonian Era" recently appeared in Michael Gomez ed., Diasporic Africa. He has also contributed essays on the significance of dreams in the African-American folk tradition and on the scholarship and activism of George P. Rawick in the Encyclopedia of African-American Folklore.</p>

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