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The Tiger in the Attic : Memories of the Kindertransport and Growing Up English

By: Milton, Edith.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (256 p.).ISBN: 9780226529486.Subject(s): Jewish children - England - Biography | Jews, German - England - Biography | Milton, Edith | Refugee children - England - BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Tiger in the Attic : Memories of the Kindertransport and Growing Up EnglishDDC classification: 940.53/18/092 | 940.5318092 LOC classification: DS135.E6 | M558 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Getting There; Eggs; The Second Year of the War; Leeds; Down in the Forest; Mutti and Pappi; The Tiger in the Attic; Jesus and Me; Dried Eggs and Puberty; War and Peace; Saint Bride's; Leaving; Ocean Crossing; Chamber Music; Understanding Mother; Weather
Summary: In 1939, on the eve of Hitler's invasion of Poland, seven-year-old Edith Milton (then Edith Cohn) and her sister Ruth left Germany by way of the Kindertransport, the program which gave some 10,000 Jewish children refuge in England. The two were given shelter by a jovial, upper-class British foster family with whom they lived for the next seven years. Edith chronicles these transformative experiences of exile and good fortune in The Tiger in the Attic, a touching memoir of growing up as an outsider in a strange land. In this illuminating chronicle, Edith describes how she st
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DS135.E6 M558 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=408593 Available EBL408593
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DS134.85.A73 2009 Holocaust in the Soviet Union. DS135.B38E67 2008 Minsk Ghetto 1941-1943 : DS135 .C95 L35 2013 Czechs, Slovaks and the Jews, 1938-48 : DS135.E6 M558 2008 The Tiger in the Attic : DS135.E75 S64 2004eb Operation Solomon : DS135.E81 S538 2013 Cultural Exchange : DS135.E83A68 2010 Anti-Jewish Violence :

Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Getting There; Eggs; The Second Year of the War; Leeds; Down in the Forest; Mutti and Pappi; The Tiger in the Attic; Jesus and Me; Dried Eggs and Puberty; War and Peace; Saint Bride's; Leaving; Ocean Crossing; Chamber Music; Understanding Mother; Weather

In 1939, on the eve of Hitler's invasion of Poland, seven-year-old Edith Milton (then Edith Cohn) and her sister Ruth left Germany by way of the Kindertransport, the program which gave some 10,000 Jewish children refuge in England. The two were given shelter by a jovial, upper-class British foster family with whom they lived for the next seven years. Edith chronicles these transformative experiences of exile and good fortune in The Tiger in the Attic, a touching memoir of growing up as an outsider in a strange land. In this illuminating chronicle, Edith describes how she st

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In 1939, Milton was one of thousands of Jewish children who escaped from Nazi Germany on the Kindertransport. Although her mother had obtained a visa to the United States, Milton and her older sister were unable to join her until after the war, and this memoir focuses on the more than six years that Milton spent as the foster child of a Christian English family. Although Milton's story proceeds in a generally linear fashion, she makes numerous digressions. For example, in her discussions about her father, who died prior to her departure from Germany, Milton makes reference to an older half brother, whom she finally meets years later in Tel Aviv. While her narrative includes the familiar references to wartime shortages and the fear of aerial assault, at its center is her realization that memory has an elastic quality; images of her past both fade and become more vivid as she grows older. Some of the most poignant moments involve her difficulty in emotionally reconnecting with her mother after six years of separation and her ambiguous relationship with her Jewish heritage. Recommended for all libraries. [For an interview with Milton, see "Fall Editors' Picks," LJ 9/1/05.-Ed.]-Frederic Krome, Jacob Rader Marcus Ctr. of the American Jewish Archives, Cincinnati (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Born in Karlsruhe, Germany, Edith Milton is a freelance writer who lives in California and New Hampshire. Her writing has appeared in, among other places, the New York Times Book Review , New Republic , and Boston Globe . She is the author of the novel Corridors .<br>

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