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Defining the Peace : World War II Veterans, Race, and the Remaking of Southern Political Tradition

By: Brooks, Jennifer E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2005Description: 1 online resource (275 p.).ISBN: 9780807875759.Subject(s): Veterans | World War, 1939-1945Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Defining the Peace : World War II Veterans, Race, and the Remaking of Southern Political TraditionDDC classification: 305.906970975809045 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1 Introduction: World War II Veterans and the Politics of Postwar Change in Georgia; 2 The Ballot Must Be Our Weapon: Black Veterans and the Politics of Racial Change; 3 The Question of Majority Rule: White Veterans and the Politics of Progressive Reform; 4 Is This What We Fought the War For? Union Veterans and the Politics of Labor; 5 We Are Not Radicals, Neither Are We Reactionaries: Good Government Veterans and the Politics of Modernization
6 Hitler Is Not Dead but Has Found Refuge in Georgia: The General Assembly of 1947 and the Limits of ProgressConclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In the aftermath of World War II, Georgia's veterans--black, white, liberal, reactionary, pro-union, and anti-union--all found that service in the war enhanced their sense of male, political, and racial identity, but often in contradictory ways. In Defining the Peace, Jennifer E. Brooks shows how veterans competed in a protracted and sometimes violent struggle to determine the complex character of Georgia's postwar future. Brooks finds that veterans shaped the key events of the era, including the gubernatorial campaigns of both Eugene Talmadge and Herman Talmadge, the defeat of
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D810.V42U63 2004 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=413240 Available EBL413240

Contents; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1 Introduction: World War II Veterans and the Politics of Postwar Change in Georgia; 2 The Ballot Must Be Our Weapon: Black Veterans and the Politics of Racial Change; 3 The Question of Majority Rule: White Veterans and the Politics of Progressive Reform; 4 Is This What We Fought the War For? Union Veterans and the Politics of Labor; 5 We Are Not Radicals, Neither Are We Reactionaries: Good Government Veterans and the Politics of Modernization

6 Hitler Is Not Dead but Has Found Refuge in Georgia: The General Assembly of 1947 and the Limits of ProgressConclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In the aftermath of World War II, Georgia's veterans--black, white, liberal, reactionary, pro-union, and anti-union--all found that service in the war enhanced their sense of male, political, and racial identity, but often in contradictory ways. In Defining the Peace, Jennifer E. Brooks shows how veterans competed in a protracted and sometimes violent struggle to determine the complex character of Georgia's postwar future. Brooks finds that veterans shaped the key events of the era, including the gubernatorial campaigns of both Eugene Talmadge and Herman Talmadge, the defeat of

Description based upon print version of record.

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Brooks (Tusculum College) adds to a still emerging body of literature on the effects of local leaders to affect political, racial, and economic change after WW II. She focuses on the efforts of both white and African American veterans to take advantage of the war's desolating effects on the South's institutions. However, a conservative backlash as well as dimensions within the movements for change ultimately stymied the efforts at progressive change. Racist and antiunion traditions proved too sturdy, and modernization came to the South with traditional practices of the prewar South affixed. Brooks uses a great deal of impressive primary and secondary material. She reminds readers that progressive movements were carried out not by national leaders or local people, but by both. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. P. Hobbs North Carolina State University

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