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Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic.

By: Mason, Matthew.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (352 p.).ISBN: 9780807876633.Subject(s): SlaveryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Slavery and Politics in the Early American RepublicDDC classification: 306.362097309033 | 326.0973/09034 | 326.09730903 LOC classification: E446.M395 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION; 1. Slavery and Politics to 1808; 2. Federalists, Republicans, and Slavery during the War of 1812; 3. Slavery and Partisan Conflict during the Era of Good Feelings; 4. Slavery in Anglo-American Relations; 5. The Political Impact of African Americans; 6. Defending against Slavery; 7. Defending Slavery; 8. Commencement Exercises: The Missouri Crisis; 9. Antebellum Legacies; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX
Summary: Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of 1819. Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were enmeshed in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which slavery went uncontested. The American Revolution set in motion the split between slave states and free states, but Mason explains that the divide took on greater importance in the early nineteenth century. He examin
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E445.P3 N37 1991eb Freedom by Degrees : E445.S7D87 1996 Them Dark Days : E445.T47 R49 2007 Texas Terror : E446.M395 2006 Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic. E446 .V363 2010 A Slaveholders' Union : E447 .R83 2006 The River Flows On : E449 .B67 2005 No Taint of Compromise :

CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION; 1. Slavery and Politics to 1808; 2. Federalists, Republicans, and Slavery during the War of 1812; 3. Slavery and Partisan Conflict during the Era of Good Feelings; 4. Slavery in Anglo-American Relations; 5. The Political Impact of African Americans; 6. Defending against Slavery; 7. Defending Slavery; 8. Commencement Exercises: The Missouri Crisis; 9. Antebellum Legacies; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX

Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of 1819. Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were enmeshed in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which slavery went uncontested. The American Revolution set in motion the split between slave states and free states, but Mason explains that the divide took on greater importance in the early nineteenth century. He examin

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Americans developed a slavery-driven sectional politics in the 1810s, before the Missouri controversy, according to Mason (Brigham Young Univ.). He thus contends with historians who see a quiet period in slavery disputes before 1819 and those who find it the sectional issue as early as the Constitutional Convention. Mason begins with opponents of the War of 1812, who denounced the perceived unfairness of "slave representation" fostered by the "three-fifths clause" of the Constitution. After the war, antislavery concerns centered on the rapid expansion of the slave states and northern fears of dwindling power within the union. Mason also considers the colonization movement and African American opposition thereto. Throughout, he emphasizes rhetorical pro- and antislavery modes of thought that shaped the contours of sectional politics, as well as regional variations. Mid-Atlantic opponents of slavery dwelt more on kidnapping of free blacks while northwesterners inveighed against the expansion of slavery, for example. Mason argues his interpretation of sectional politics narrowly, but he backs his claims with solid scholarship and a careful use of his sources. Scholars and general readers alike will profit from this book. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. T. S. Whitman Mount St. Mary's University

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