Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Mr. Jefferson's Lost Cause : Land, Farmers, Slavery, and the Louisiana Purchase

By: Kennedy, Roger G.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, USA, 2003Description: 1 online resource (369 p.).ISBN: 9780198034988.Subject(s): Family farms | Jefferson, Thomas | Land settlement | Louisiana Purchase | Plantation owners | SlaveryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Mr. Jefferson's Lost Cause : Land, Farmers, Slavery, and the Louisiana PurchaseDDC classification: 973.46 | 973.46092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Chronology; PART ONE: The Land and Mr. Jefferson; PART TWO: The Invisible Empire and the Land; PART THREE: Resistance to the Plantation System; Acknowledgments; PART FOUR: Agents of the Master Organism: Assistants to the Plantation System; EPILOGUE; APPENDIX; Notes; Bibliographic Note; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Thomas Jefferson advocated a republic of small farmers--free and independent yeomen. And yet as president he presided over a massive expansion of the slaveholding plantation system--particularly with the Louisiana Purchase--squeezing the yeomanry to the fringes and to less desirable farmland. Now Roger Kennedy conducts an eye-opening examination of that gap between Jefferson's stated aspirations and what actually happened. Kennedy reveals how the Louisiana Purchase had a major impact on land use and the growth of slavery. He examines the great financial interests (such as the powerful land com
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Contents; Chronology; PART ONE: The Land and Mr. Jefferson; PART TWO: The Invisible Empire and the Land; PART THREE: Resistance to the Plantation System; Acknowledgments; PART FOUR: Agents of the Master Organism: Assistants to the Plantation System; EPILOGUE; APPENDIX; Notes; Bibliographic Note; Bibliography; Index

Thomas Jefferson advocated a republic of small farmers--free and independent yeomen. And yet as president he presided over a massive expansion of the slaveholding plantation system--particularly with the Louisiana Purchase--squeezing the yeomanry to the fringes and to less desirable farmland. Now Roger Kennedy conducts an eye-opening examination of that gap between Jefferson's stated aspirations and what actually happened. Kennedy reveals how the Louisiana Purchase had a major impact on land use and the growth of slavery. He examines the great financial interests (such as the powerful land com

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The term Lost Cause generally refers to ex-slaveholders' hopes for an independent slaveholding Confederacy but is partly traceable to Thomas Jefferson, who envisioned free and independent yeomen, or small family farmers, as the foundation of the American republic. Yet his loyalties ultimately lay with the slaveholding plantation owners. Kennedy (director emeritus, National Museum of American History) argues that Jefferson's support of slaveholders turned his dreams for a yeoman republic into a lost cause. Jefferson's policies, including the acquisition of the Louisiana Purchase, served slaveholders, whose ruinous land-use patterns and indebtedness to British interests contributed mightily to the territorial expansion of slavery. Kennedy has written an enjoyable and provocative work, taking a novel approach but backing it with good documentation. On the 200th anniversary of the Louisiana Purchase, this book is an essential addition for academic and public libraries.-Charles L. Lumpkins, Pennsylvania State Univ., State College (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This volume has the potential to motivate a major historical reinterpretation of the Louisiana Purchase, along with the westward movement it produced. Kennedy (director emer., National Museum of American History) believes the Louisiana Purchase itself was an early chapter in the struggle between the expansion of free-soil, antislave, yeoman agriculture and the countervailing southern, slave-based, plantation system. He contends that Jefferson, the most influential American of his generation in setting and implementing western land policy, emerged as the leader of politically powerful Virginians who quietly promoted plantation agriculture and its ruinous environmental impact on the land. They manipulated foreign policy and subsequent land laws to insure that the plantation-based, cotton growing slaveocracy would dominate the Gulf Coast and Louisiana Purchase territory. Jefferson and his circle consciously did this at the contradictory expense of the free yeoman who nonetheless stood at the center of their political theory and public rhetoric. Kennedy adeptly traces the advance of the southern plantation matrix into Spanish east and west Florida before examining its eventual domination of the lower part of the Mississippi valley. Based on solid research, this volume offers a provocative new viewpoint regarding a crucial era of US frontier expansion. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels/collections. L. T. Cummins Austin College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Roger Kennedy is Director Emeritus of the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, and a past Director of the National Park Service. He has had a long and distinguished career in public service during which he has served six presidents. His books include Burr, Hamilton, and Jefferson and (as general editor and contributor) the twelve-volume Smithsonian Guide to Historic America.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.