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Conservation and the Genetics of Populations.

By: Allendorf, Fred W.
Contributor(s): Luikart, Gordon.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Wiley, 2009Description: 1 online resource (662 p.).ISBN: 9781444309058.Subject(s): Biodiversity conservation | Evolutionary genetics | Genes | Population geneticsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Conservation and the Genetics of PopulationsDDC classification: 576.5/8 | 577.88 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Authors of Guest Boxes; Preface; List of Symbols; Part I Introduction; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Genetics and conservation; 1.2 What should we conserve?; 1.3 How should we conserve biodiversity?; 1.4 Applications of genetics to conservation; Guest Box 1 The role of genetics in conservation; 2 Phenotypic Variation in Natural Populations; 2.1 Color pattern; 2.2 Morphology; 2.3 Behavior; 2.4 Differences among populations; Guest Box 2 Looks can be deceiving: countergradient variation in secondary sexual color in sympatric morphs of sockeye salmon
3 Genetic Variation in Natural Populations: Chromosomes and Proteins3.1 Chromosomes; 3.2 Protein electrophoresis; 3.3 Genetic variation within natural populations; 3.4 Genetic divergence among populations; 3.5 Strengths and limitations of protein electrophoresis; Guest Box 3 Management implications of polyploidy in a cytologically complex self-incompatible herb; 4 Genetic Variation in Natural Populations: DNA; 4.1 Mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA; 4.2 Single copy nuclear loci; 4.3 Multilocus techniques; 4.4 Sex-linked markers; 4.5 DNA sequences; 4.6 Additional techniques and the future
4.7 Genetic variation in natural populationsGuest Box 4 Multiple markers uncover marine turtle behavior; Part II Mechanisms of Evolutionary Change; 5 Random Mating Populations: Hardy-Weinberg Principle; 5.1 The Hardy-Weinberg principle; 5.2 Hardy-Weinberg proportions; 5.3 Testing for Hardy-Weinberg proportions; 5.4 Estimation of allele frequencies; 5.5 Sex-linked loci; 5.6 Estimation of genetic variation; Guest Box 5 Testing alternative explanations for deficiencies of heterozygotes in populations of brook trout in small lakes; 6 Small Populations and Genetic Drift; 6.1 Genetic drift
6.2 Changes in allele frequency6.3 Loss of genetic variation: the inbreeding effect of small populations; 6.4 Loss of allelic diversity; 6.5 Founder effect; 6.6 Genotypic proportions in small populations; 6.7 Fitness effects of genetic drift; Guest Box 6 The inbreeding effect of small population size reduces population growth rate in mosquitofish; 7 Effective Population Size; 7.1 Concept of effective population size; 7.2 Unequal sex ratio; 7.3 Nonrandom number of progeny; 7.4 Fluctuating population size; 7.5 Overlapping generations; 7.6 Variance effective population size
7.7 Cytoplasmic genes7.8 Gene genealogies and lineage sorting; 7.9 Limitations of effective population size; 7.10 Effective population size in natural populations; Guest Box 7 Estimation of effective population size in Yellowstone grizzly bears; 8 Natural Selection; 8.1 Fitness; 8.2 Single locus with two alleles; 8.3 Multiple alleles; 8.4 Frequency-dependent selection; 8.5 Natural selection in small populations; 8.6 Natural selection and conservation; Guest Box 8 Rapid adaptation and conservation; 9 Population Subdivision; 9.1 F-statistics; 9.2 Complete isolation; 9.3 Gene flow
9.4 Gene flow and genetic drift
Summary: Conservation and the Genetics of Populations gives a comprehensive overview of the essential background, concepts, and tools needed to understand how genetic information can be used to develop conservation plans for species threatened with extinction.Provides a thorough understanding of the genetic basis of biological problems in conservation.Uses a balance of data and theory, and basic and applied research, with examples taken from both the animal and plant kingdoms.An associated website contains example data sets and software programs to illustrate populati
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Authors of Guest Boxes; Preface; List of Symbols; Part I Introduction; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Genetics and conservation; 1.2 What should we conserve?; 1.3 How should we conserve biodiversity?; 1.4 Applications of genetics to conservation; Guest Box 1 The role of genetics in conservation; 2 Phenotypic Variation in Natural Populations; 2.1 Color pattern; 2.2 Morphology; 2.3 Behavior; 2.4 Differences among populations; Guest Box 2 Looks can be deceiving: countergradient variation in secondary sexual color in sympatric morphs of sockeye salmon

3 Genetic Variation in Natural Populations: Chromosomes and Proteins3.1 Chromosomes; 3.2 Protein electrophoresis; 3.3 Genetic variation within natural populations; 3.4 Genetic divergence among populations; 3.5 Strengths and limitations of protein electrophoresis; Guest Box 3 Management implications of polyploidy in a cytologically complex self-incompatible herb; 4 Genetic Variation in Natural Populations: DNA; 4.1 Mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA; 4.2 Single copy nuclear loci; 4.3 Multilocus techniques; 4.4 Sex-linked markers; 4.5 DNA sequences; 4.6 Additional techniques and the future

4.7 Genetic variation in natural populationsGuest Box 4 Multiple markers uncover marine turtle behavior; Part II Mechanisms of Evolutionary Change; 5 Random Mating Populations: Hardy-Weinberg Principle; 5.1 The Hardy-Weinberg principle; 5.2 Hardy-Weinberg proportions; 5.3 Testing for Hardy-Weinberg proportions; 5.4 Estimation of allele frequencies; 5.5 Sex-linked loci; 5.6 Estimation of genetic variation; Guest Box 5 Testing alternative explanations for deficiencies of heterozygotes in populations of brook trout in small lakes; 6 Small Populations and Genetic Drift; 6.1 Genetic drift

6.2 Changes in allele frequency6.3 Loss of genetic variation: the inbreeding effect of small populations; 6.4 Loss of allelic diversity; 6.5 Founder effect; 6.6 Genotypic proportions in small populations; 6.7 Fitness effects of genetic drift; Guest Box 6 The inbreeding effect of small population size reduces population growth rate in mosquitofish; 7 Effective Population Size; 7.1 Concept of effective population size; 7.2 Unequal sex ratio; 7.3 Nonrandom number of progeny; 7.4 Fluctuating population size; 7.5 Overlapping generations; 7.6 Variance effective population size

7.7 Cytoplasmic genes7.8 Gene genealogies and lineage sorting; 7.9 Limitations of effective population size; 7.10 Effective population size in natural populations; Guest Box 7 Estimation of effective population size in Yellowstone grizzly bears; 8 Natural Selection; 8.1 Fitness; 8.2 Single locus with two alleles; 8.3 Multiple alleles; 8.4 Frequency-dependent selection; 8.5 Natural selection in small populations; 8.6 Natural selection and conservation; Guest Box 8 Rapid adaptation and conservation; 9 Population Subdivision; 9.1 F-statistics; 9.2 Complete isolation; 9.3 Gene flow

9.4 Gene flow and genetic drift

Conservation and the Genetics of Populations gives a comprehensive overview of the essential background, concepts, and tools needed to understand how genetic information can be used to develop conservation plans for species threatened with extinction.Provides a thorough understanding of the genetic basis of biological problems in conservation.Uses a balance of data and theory, and basic and applied research, with examples taken from both the animal and plant kingdoms.An associated website contains example data sets and software programs to illustrate populati

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This updated, expanded second edition (1st ed., CH, Feb'07, 44-3275) by Allendorf and Luikart (both, Univ. of Montana) and Aitken (Univ. of British Columbia) provides a good summary of a rapidly developing field. The volume is divided into three main parts, "Introduction," "Mechanisms of Evolutionary Change," and "Genetics and Conservation," each comprising four to nine chapters. The first two parts present background information, while the last part develops the core concepts of the interaction between conservation and genetics using many important examples, albeit largely drawn from the animal kingdom. The book contains an enormously helpful glossary and an expansive current reference section that will guide interested readers to the pertinent primary literature. Though the authors claim in the preface that they want to serve as advocates for conservation, not genetics, much of the precious space, particularly in the beginning, is devoted to developing a background in genetics. The authors' attempt to be comprehensive yet concise results in an enormously dense and shortened treatment of individual topics. This book will be a great teaching tool, but it could have been more exciting and convincing to students and conservationists if more space had been devoted to conservation, not genetics--a missed opportunity. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above. B. Blossey Cornell University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Fred W. Allendorf is a Regents Professor at the University of Montana and a Professorial Research Fellow at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. His primary research interests are conservation and population genetics. He has published over 200 articles on the population genetics and conservation of fish, amphibians, mammals, invertebrates, and plants. He is a past President of the American Genetic Association, served as Director of the Population Biology Program of the National Science Foundation, and has served on the editorial boards of Conservation Biology , Molecular Ecology , Evolution , Conservation Genetics , Molecular Biology and Evolution , and the Journal of Heredity . He has taught conservation genetics at the University of Montana, University of Oregon, University of Minnesota, and Victoria University of Wellington.<br> <p><br></p> <p> Gordon Luikart is a Research Associate Professor at the University of Montana and a Visiting Professor in the Center for Investigation of Biodiversity and Genetic Resources at the University of Porto, Portugal. He was a Research Scientist with the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique(CNRS)at the University Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, France. His research focuses on the conservation and genetics of wild and domestic animals, and includes nearly 50 publications in the field. He was a Fulbright Scholar at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, is a member of the IUCN specialists group for Caprinae (mountain ungulate) conservation, and has served on the editorial boards of Conservation Biology and Molecular Ecology Notes. <br></p>

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