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Them Dark Days : Slavery in the American Rice Swamps

By: Dusinberre, William.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, USA, 1996Description: 1 online resource (571 p.).ISBN: 9780198025108.Subject(s): Plantation life | Rice | SlaveryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Them Dark Days : Slavery in the American Rice SwampsDDC classification: 306.36209757 | 306.36209757 LOC classification: E445.S7D87 1996Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; I: GOWRIE: A MANIGAULT ESTATE; II: BUTLER ISLAND; III: ROBERT ALLSTON'S PLANTATIONS; IV: THE WIDER SCENE; Appendixes; Notes; Index
Summary: In this groundbreaking book, Dusinberre conducts an intense investigation of slavery in the rice swamps of South Carolina and Georgia. Concentrated there were some of the richest--and most expansive--plantations of the South. It was an unhealthy region for both blacks and whites; slavery, in the swamps, was administered with particular severity. Focusing on three of the largest plantations, Dusinberre presents portraits of individuals, both black and white, who personify and exemplify the harsh realities of the slave system. Them Dark Days offers a vivid reconstruction of slavery in action; wh
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E445.S7D87 1996 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=430804 Available EBL430804

Contents; I: GOWRIE: A MANIGAULT ESTATE; II: BUTLER ISLAND; III: ROBERT ALLSTON'S PLANTATIONS; IV: THE WIDER SCENE; Appendixes; Notes; Index

In this groundbreaking book, Dusinberre conducts an intense investigation of slavery in the rice swamps of South Carolina and Georgia. Concentrated there were some of the richest--and most expansive--plantations of the South. It was an unhealthy region for both blacks and whites; slavery, in the swamps, was administered with particular severity. Focusing on three of the largest plantations, Dusinberre presents portraits of individuals, both black and white, who personify and exemplify the harsh realities of the slave system. Them Dark Days offers a vivid reconstruction of slavery in action; wh

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Dusinberre adopts a neoabolitionist interpretation and revises such scholars as Charles Joyner, Peter Coclanis, Eugene Genovese, Philip Morgan, and Julia Smith, who have "rightly wished to stress the slaves' often heroic dissidence against slavery ... but perversely, and unnecessarily" suggest "that the effects of living under the slave regime penetrated only skin deep." Dusinberre fears that recent scholars have succumbed to "romanticizing the realities" of slave life and have been too quick to categorize slave behavior and character. He exposes a system that was incredibly severe, no matter how the slaves fashioned ways to resist it. "The masters," he writes, "were profit-seeking agricultural capitalists, not paternalists; and callousness toward their slaves marked their rule." Dusinberre emphasizes the high rate of slave child mortality on rice plantations (almost two-fifths of all babies died during their first year of life). Masters were more interested in making profits and maintaining plantation discipline than in keeping the slaves alive. Them Dark Days significantly challenges recent scholarship and adds new meaning to the neoabolitionist interpretation. For all college and university collections. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. D. Smith North Carolina State University

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