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American Taxation, American Slavery.

By: Einhorn, Robin L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (350 p.).ISBN: 9780226194899.Subject(s): Slavery -- Economic aspects -- United States -- History | Slavery -- Political aspects -- United States -- History | States' rights (American politics) | Taxation -- Political aspects -- United States -- History | United States -- Politics and government -- 1775-1783 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1783-1865Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American Taxation, American SlaveryDDC classification: 336.200973 | 973.71 LOC classification: E441 | .E364 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Tables, Figures, and Maps; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Prologue: Taxation without Representation; Part I Colonial Tax Systems; 1 Virginia; 2 Massachusetts; 3 Variations; Part II National Tax Politics; 4 The Origin of the Tariff; 5 Direct Taxes; Part III The Synthesis in the States; 6 Property Taxes; Epilogue: James Madison on Slave Taxes; Appendix: How to Talk about Taxes; Notes; Index
Summary: For all the recent attention to the slaveholding of the founding fathers, we still know remarkably little about the influence of slavery on American politics. American Taxation, American Slavery tackles this problem in a new way. Rather than parsing the ideological pronouncements of charismatic slaveholders, it examines the concrete policy decisions that slaveholders and non-slaveholders made in the critical realm of taxation. The result is surprising-that the enduring power of antigovernment rhetoric in the United States stems from the nation's history of slavery rath
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E441 .E364 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=432213 Available EBL432213

Contents; List of Tables, Figures, and Maps; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Prologue: Taxation without Representation; Part I Colonial Tax Systems; 1 Virginia; 2 Massachusetts; 3 Variations; Part II National Tax Politics; 4 The Origin of the Tariff; 5 Direct Taxes; Part III The Synthesis in the States; 6 Property Taxes; Epilogue: James Madison on Slave Taxes; Appendix: How to Talk about Taxes; Notes; Index

For all the recent attention to the slaveholding of the founding fathers, we still know remarkably little about the influence of slavery on American politics. American Taxation, American Slavery tackles this problem in a new way. Rather than parsing the ideological pronouncements of charismatic slaveholders, it examines the concrete policy decisions that slaveholders and non-slaveholders made in the critical realm of taxation. The result is surprising-that the enduring power of antigovernment rhetoric in the United States stems from the nation's history of slavery rath

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The twist in this tax history, which sifts through the same early American debates as previous accounts, is the central importance of slavery. Tax policy, at all levels of government and in all regions, was entwined with the slave debate, not only in the historic compromises over taxation and slave representation embodied in the Constitution, but extending into the design of 19th-century state and local taxation as well. As with other recent revisions of the era's history, stripping away the principled rhetoric reveals tax policy warped to accommodate slavery in order to preserve the union. At the federal level, the tariff became the mainstay of public finance, in part to avoid explicit apportioning of taxes among slave and nonslave states. At the state and local levels, regional disparities predominated. Slave states, lacking the essential grassroots democratic institutions and encumbered by high levels of violence, were incapable of implementing the sophisticated, progressive tax regimes of the North. Well into the 19th century, as regional disparities diminished, slavery continued to affect tax policy as uniformity clauses, designed to preclude punitive taxation of slavery, were embraced by northern states, unintentionally undermining tax progressivity. An interesting, if not altogether compelling, interpretation of early US taxation. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. R. S. Hewett Drake University

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