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Pistoleros and Popular Movements : The Politics of State Formation in Postrevolutionary Oaxaca

By: Smith, Benjamin T.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.The Mexican Experience: Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (608 p.).ISBN: 9780803224629.Subject(s): Social movementsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Pistoleros and Popular Movements : The Politics of State Formation in Postrevolutionary OaxacaDDC classification: 972.082 | 972/.74082 22 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. Revolution and Stasis in Oaxaca, 1876-1928; 2. The Caudillo and the State, 1928-34; 3. The Rise of Cardenismo and the Decline of Chicolopismo, 1932-36; 4. The Politics of Cardenismo, 1936-40; 5. Cárdenas's Caciques, 1936-40; 6. Politics and Socioeconomic Reform, 1936-40; 7. The Problems with Cardenista Politics and the Rise of the Urban Social Movement, 1940-44; 8. The Rise and Fall of Edmundo Sánchez Cano, 1944-47; 9. The Vallistocracia Governor, 1947-50
10. The Short Reign of Manuel Mayoral Heredia,1950-52Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The postrevolutionary reconstruction of the Mexican government did not easily or immediately reach all corners of the country. At every level, political intermediaries negotiated, resisted, appropriated, or ignored the dictates of the central government. National policy reverberated through Mexico's local and political networks in countless different ways and resulted in a myriad of regional arrangements. It is this process of diffusion, politicking, and conflict that Benjamin T. Smith examines in Pistoleros and Popular Movements.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F1321 .S64 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=452188 Available EBL452188
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F1256.S84 2002eb Zapata Lives! : F1314 .L39 2012 Frontier Naturalist : F1316 .M44 2012 From Colony to Nationhood in Mexico : F1321 .S64 2009 Pistoleros and Popular Movements : F1376 .E377 2010 In the Name of El Pueblo : F1386.9.B55 B46 2003 Africans in Colonial Mexico : F1386.9.B55 B46 2003eb Africans in Colonial Mexico :

Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. Revolution and Stasis in Oaxaca, 1876-1928; 2. The Caudillo and the State, 1928-34; 3. The Rise of Cardenismo and the Decline of Chicolopismo, 1932-36; 4. The Politics of Cardenismo, 1936-40; 5. Cárdenas's Caciques, 1936-40; 6. Politics and Socioeconomic Reform, 1936-40; 7. The Problems with Cardenista Politics and the Rise of the Urban Social Movement, 1940-44; 8. The Rise and Fall of Edmundo Sánchez Cano, 1944-47; 9. The Vallistocracia Governor, 1947-50

10. The Short Reign of Manuel Mayoral Heredia,1950-52Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

The postrevolutionary reconstruction of the Mexican government did not easily or immediately reach all corners of the country. At every level, political intermediaries negotiated, resisted, appropriated, or ignored the dictates of the central government. National policy reverberated through Mexico's local and political networks in countless different ways and resulted in a myriad of regional arrangements. It is this process of diffusion, politicking, and conflict that Benjamin T. Smith examines in Pistoleros and Popular Movements.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Smith (Michigan State Univ.) examines Oaxaca's autonomy from both state and federal authorities in the postrevolutionary era, arguing that the latter did not end with the Cardenas administration in 1940, but rather extended into the 1950s. He eschews the historiographical framework of three successive generations: pluralism (1940s-60s), revisionism (1960s-80s), and neo-Gramscian (2000-present). Instead, he posits particularity, in which caciques at the district level, mass popular groups at the municipal level, and camarillas (political cliques) at the intrastate level "modified, contradicted, and paralyzed the state's projects." For Smith, "mid-level politics"--between state and locality--was key geopolitically, with the caciques and camarillas the pivots around which the postrevolutionary state-formation process moved and hinged. The federal government increasingly manipulated relations between governor, district strongmen, local bureaucrats, popular groups, and village councils. After providing a background of the late-19th and early-20th centuries, Smith details the impact of Cardenismo and then that of Presidents Avila Camacho and Aleman. He makes use of extensive state and federal archives (public and private) along with Oaxacan newspapers and a broad range of secondary works. Summing Up: Recommended. Best suited for graduate students and scholars. S. F. Voss Plattsburgh SUNY

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Benjamin T. Smith is an assistant professor of history at Michigan State University. His articles have appeared in Journal of Latin American Studies , Bulletin of Latin American Research , Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos , and multiple edited volumes.

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