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Between Home and Homeland : Youth Aliyah from Nazi Germany

By: Amkraut, Brian.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Judaic Studies Series: Publisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (247 p.).ISBN: 9780817381622.Subject(s): Germany - Emigration and immigration - History - 20th century | Jewish children in the Holocaust | Jews - Germany - Migrations | Jews - Germany - Politics and government | Palestine - Emigration and immigration - History - 20th century | Palestine -- Emigration and immigration -- History -- 20th century.Jews -- Germany -- Migrations.Jews -- Germany -- Politics and government.Zionism -- Germany -- History -- 20th century.Jewish childre | Zionism - Germany - History - 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Between Home and Homeland : Youth Aliyah from Nazi GermanyDDC classification: 940.53/183508350943 | 943.004924 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; Introduction: Dealing with the Nazis; 1. 1932-The Decisive Year; 2. Spreading the Word; 3. Emigration or Welfare Movement?; 4. After the Pogrom; 5. Conflicts and Resolutions; Epilogue; Notes; Glossary; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The emigration of Jewish teenagers to Palestine to escape Hitler's Germany.   While the future darkened for the Jews of Germany as Hitler and his followers assumed and consolidated power in Germany, a number of efforts, at first random, uncoordinated, and often at cross-purposes with one another, were set underway both within and without German cities to facilitate the departure of Jews. Among them was the organization, "Youth Aliyah" (aliyah refers to the Zionist goal of a homecoming for Jews in historic Israel). To this day Youth Aliyah is considered by Israelis as
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS135.G3315 A457 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=454502 Available EBL454502

Contents; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; Introduction: Dealing with the Nazis; 1. 1932-The Decisive Year; 2. Spreading the Word; 3. Emigration or Welfare Movement?; 4. After the Pogrom; 5. Conflicts and Resolutions; Epilogue; Notes; Glossary; Bibliography; Index

The emigration of Jewish teenagers to Palestine to escape Hitler's Germany.   While the future darkened for the Jews of Germany as Hitler and his followers assumed and consolidated power in Germany, a number of efforts, at first random, uncoordinated, and often at cross-purposes with one another, were set underway both within and without German cities to facilitate the departure of Jews. Among them was the organization, "Youth Aliyah" (aliyah refers to the Zionist goal of a homecoming for Jews in historic Israel). To this day Youth Aliyah is considered by Israelis as

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Amkraut (Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies) has written a fascinating book about young German Jews who immigrated to Palestine during the 1930s. The impediments for Jewish Germans, who had to cope with a number of hostile entities, were both practical and emotional. The British made Palestinian immigration very difficult, imposing numerous limits on settlers to avoid offending the region's Arabs. In addition, there was the issue of assimilating into a developing multiethnic land with an indigenous population that was not welcoming. Amkraut also discusses the identity dilemma for Jews who grew up feeling German, and then had to alter their self-image in the face of growing discrimination. He highlights the internal disagreements of Jewish agencies who wrestled with myriad problems. This book is based on an abundance of archival sources and a thorough use of secondary literature. The author explores how German Jews were ideologically heterogeneous, and details how different groups coped with increasing antagonism in a variety of ways. The author's focus is more European than Palestinian, and it would be interesting to have a bit more information on the settlements themselves. Overall, this interesting monograph adds to the excellent body of literature on German Jews. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. R. Sharfman Manchester College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Brian Amkraut is executive director of the Siegal Lifelong Learning Program at Case Western Reserve University.

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