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Jews in Nazi Berlin : From Kristallnacht to Liberation

By: Meyer, Beate.
Contributor(s): Simon, Hermann | Schütz, Chana.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in German-Jewish Cultural Histor: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (414 p.).ISBN: 9780226521596.Subject(s): Berlin (Germany) -- Ethnic relations | Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Germany -- Berlin | Jews -- Germany -- Berlin -- History -- 20th century | Jews -- Germany -- History -- 1933-1945Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Jews in Nazi Berlin : From Kristallnacht to LiberationDDC classification: 940.53/180943155 | 940.53180943155 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreword by Hermann Simon; Editors' Preface; PART ONE: 1938; 1 1938: The Year of Fate; 2 The Juni-Aktion (June Operation) in Berlin; PART TWO: EMIGRATION; 3 The Flight and Expulsion of German Jews; PART THREE: ARYANIZATION; 4 "Aryanized" and Financially Ruined: The Case of the Garbáty Family; PART FOUR: THE YELLOW STAR; 5 Berlin Jews: Deprived of Rights, Impoverished, and Branded; 6 The Jüdisches Nachrichtenblatt, 1938-43; PART FIVE: ZIONISTS; 7 אף על פי כן (In Spite of Everything): Zionists in Berlin; PART SIX: FORCED LABOR; 8 Forced Labor; 9 The Rosenstrasse Protest
PART SEVEN: DEPORTATION10 The Deportations; 11 Every Person Has a Name; 12 The Opera Singer Therese Rothauser; 13 Sad Experiences in the Hell of Nazi Germany: The Scheurenberg Family; 14 Ruth Schwersenz's Poesiealbum; PART EIGHT: BETRAYAL; 15 Snatchers: The Berlin Gestapo's Jewish Informants; PART NINE: SURVIVAL; 16 How the Frankenstein Family Survived Underground, 1943-45; 17 Banished from the Fatherland: How Hans Rosenthal Survived the Nazi Regime; PART TEN: JEWISH ORGAN IZATIONS
18 The Fine Line between Responsible Action and Collaboration: The Reichsvereinigung der Juden in Deutschland and the Jewish Community in Berlin, 1938-4519 Oranienburger Strasse 28-31; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; Glossary; List of Contributors; Illustration Credits; Name Index
Summary: Though many of the details of Jewish life under Hitler are familiar, historical accounts rarely afford us a real sense of what it was like for Jews and their families to live in the shadow of Nazi Germany's oppressive racial laws and growing violence. With Jews in Nazi Berlin, those individual lives-and the constant struggle they required-come fully into focus, and the result is an unprecedented and deeply moving portrait of a people. Drawing on a remarkably rich archive that includes photographs, objects, official documents, and personal papers, the editors o
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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DS134.3 M494 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=471792 Available EBL471792

Contents; Foreword by Hermann Simon; Editors' Preface; PART ONE: 1938; 1 1938: The Year of Fate; 2 The Juni-Aktion (June Operation) in Berlin; PART TWO: EMIGRATION; 3 The Flight and Expulsion of German Jews; PART THREE: ARYANIZATION; 4 "Aryanized" and Financially Ruined: The Case of the Garbáty Family; PART FOUR: THE YELLOW STAR; 5 Berlin Jews: Deprived of Rights, Impoverished, and Branded; 6 The Jüdisches Nachrichtenblatt, 1938-43; PART FIVE: ZIONISTS; 7 אף על פי כן (In Spite of Everything): Zionists in Berlin; PART SIX: FORCED LABOR; 8 Forced Labor; 9 The Rosenstrasse Protest

PART SEVEN: DEPORTATION10 The Deportations; 11 Every Person Has a Name; 12 The Opera Singer Therese Rothauser; 13 Sad Experiences in the Hell of Nazi Germany: The Scheurenberg Family; 14 Ruth Schwersenz's Poesiealbum; PART EIGHT: BETRAYAL; 15 Snatchers: The Berlin Gestapo's Jewish Informants; PART NINE: SURVIVAL; 16 How the Frankenstein Family Survived Underground, 1943-45; 17 Banished from the Fatherland: How Hans Rosenthal Survived the Nazi Regime; PART TEN: JEWISH ORGAN IZATIONS

18 The Fine Line between Responsible Action and Collaboration: The Reichsvereinigung der Juden in Deutschland and the Jewish Community in Berlin, 1938-4519 Oranienburger Strasse 28-31; Acknowledgments; List of Abbreviations; Glossary; List of Contributors; Illustration Credits; Name Index

Though many of the details of Jewish life under Hitler are familiar, historical accounts rarely afford us a real sense of what it was like for Jews and their families to live in the shadow of Nazi Germany's oppressive racial laws and growing violence. With Jews in Nazi Berlin, those individual lives-and the constant struggle they required-come fully into focus, and the result is an unprecedented and deeply moving portrait of a people. Drawing on a remarkably rich archive that includes photographs, objects, official documents, and personal papers, the editors o

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Originally published in Germany in 2000 to accompany an exhibit on this subject, this collection of essays examines Jewish life in the German capital during the height of Nazi persecution (1938-45). Meyer (Inst. for the History of German Jews, Hamburg), with Hermann Simon and Chana Schutz (director and vice director, respectively, New Jewish Synogogue, Berlin) assert that while much attention has been paid to Nazi anti-Jewish policy and its implementation, the voices and experiences of the individual Jews are often lost; as such, these essays constitute an important dimension of the historiography. Each chapter details a specific aspect of the Jewish experience by focusing on either an event, such as the "June-Aktion" (June Action) of 1938, or on a specific theme, such as the role of Zionism in daily life. VERDCT Though the assertion that the voices of individual Jews is often ignored is questionable, and though the essays do not necessarily provide any revolutionary new insights into the Jewish experience under Nazism, the authors succeed in bridging the gap between the broad issues, such as the process of illegal immigration or hiding, and the experience of individuals. The volume is, therefore, extremely useful for both teachers and students.-Frederic Krome, Univ. of Cincinnati Clermont Coll. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Beate Meyer is a researcher at the Institute for the History of German Jews in Hamburg. Hermann Simon is the director of the New Synagogue Berlin-Centrum Judaicum Foundation. Chana Schütz is research associate at and vice-director of the New Synagogue Berlin-Centrum Judaicum Foundation.

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