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Manifesting America : The Imperial Construction of U.S. National Space

By: Rifkin, Mark.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, USA, 2009Description: 1 online resource (289 p.).ISBN: 9780199736690.Subject(s): American literature -- 1783-1850 -- History and criticism | American literature -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Human territoriality -- Political aspects -- United States -- History | Imperialism -- Study and teaching (Higher) | Indians of North America -- Land tenure | Nationalism -- United States -- History | United States -- Boundaries | United States -- Race relations | United States -- Study and teaching (Higher) | United States -- Territorial expansionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Manifesting America : The Imperial Construction of U.S. National SpaceDDC classification: 973.5 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction: Self-Determination, Subaltern Studies, and the Critical Remapping of U.S. Empire; 1. Representing the Cherokee Nation: Imperial Power and Elite Interests in the Remaking of Cherokee Governance; 2. The Territoriality of Tradition: Treaties, Hunting Grounds, and Prophecy in Black Hawk's Narrative; 3. Comanche Metaphors: Juan Seguín's Memoirs and the Figure of the Barbarian in the Struggle for Texas; 4. Partial Citizens and Insurgent Masses: Narrating Violence Past and Present in Post-1848 California; Notes; Works Cited; Index
Summary: The expansion of the U.S. in the antebellum period relied on the claim that the nation's boundaries were both self-evident and dependent on the consent of those enclosed within them. While the removal of American Indians and racism toward former Mexicans has been well-documented, little attention has been paid to the legal rhetorics through which the incorporation of these peoples and their territories was justified, portraying them as actively agreeing to come under the authority of the U.S. Yet even as the creation and extension of U.S. jurisdiction functioned as an imperial system, it did n
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E179.5 .R54 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=472355 Available EBL472355

Contents; Introduction: Self-Determination, Subaltern Studies, and the Critical Remapping of U.S. Empire; 1. Representing the Cherokee Nation: Imperial Power and Elite Interests in the Remaking of Cherokee Governance; 2. The Territoriality of Tradition: Treaties, Hunting Grounds, and Prophecy in Black Hawk's Narrative; 3. Comanche Metaphors: Juan Seguín's Memoirs and the Figure of the Barbarian in the Struggle for Texas; 4. Partial Citizens and Insurgent Masses: Narrating Violence Past and Present in Post-1848 California; Notes; Works Cited; Index

The expansion of the U.S. in the antebellum period relied on the claim that the nation's boundaries were both self-evident and dependent on the consent of those enclosed within them. While the removal of American Indians and racism toward former Mexicans has been well-documented, little attention has been paid to the legal rhetorics through which the incorporation of these peoples and their territories was justified, portraying them as actively agreeing to come under the authority of the U.S. Yet even as the creation and extension of U.S. jurisdiction functioned as an imperial system, it did n

Description based upon print version of record.

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