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Until the Last Man Comes Home : POWs, MIAs, and the Unending Vietnam War

By: Allen, Michael J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (448 p.).ISBN: 9780807895313.Subject(s): Political activists --United States | Prisoners of war --United States | United States --Politics and government --1945-1989 | United States --Politics and government --1989- | United States --Relations --Vietnam | Vietnam --Relations --United States | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 --Influence | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 --Missing in action --United States | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 --Political aspects | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 --Prisoners and prisons, North VietnameseGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Until the Last Man Comes Home : POWs, MIAs, and the Unending Vietnam WarDDC classification: 959.704/37 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Abbreviations; INTRODUCATION. The Politics of Loss; 1. GO PUBLIC: The Construction of Loss; 2. FOR US THE WAR STILL GOES ON: The Limits of Homecoming; 3. AS IT HAS IN THE PAST: A Short History of Oblivion; 4. FULLEST POSSIBLE ACCOUNTING: The Persistence of the Past; 5. The WILDERNESS YEARS: Life after Death; 6. HIGHEST NATIONAL PRIORITY: Resurrection and Retribution; 7. NOT TO CLOSE THE DOOR, BUT TO OPEN IT: The Ambiguity of Recovery; CONCLUSION. This Thing Has Consumed American Politics for Years; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index
Summary: Fewer Americans were captured or missing during the Vietnam War than in any previous major military conflict in U.S. history. Yet despite their small numbers, American POWs inspired an outpouring of concern that slowly eroded support for the war. Michael J. Allen reveals how wartime loss transformed U.S. politics well before, and long after, the war's official end.Throughout the war's last years and in the decades since, Allen argues, the effort to recover lost warriors was as much a means to establish responsibility for their loss as it was a search for answers about their fate. Thoug
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS559.4.A44 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=475164 Available EBL475164

Contents; Abbreviations; INTRODUCATION. The Politics of Loss; 1. GO PUBLIC: The Construction of Loss; 2. FOR US THE WAR STILL GOES ON: The Limits of Homecoming; 3. AS IT HAS IN THE PAST: A Short History of Oblivion; 4. FULLEST POSSIBLE ACCOUNTING: The Persistence of the Past; 5. The WILDERNESS YEARS: Life after Death; 6. HIGHEST NATIONAL PRIORITY: Resurrection and Retribution; 7. NOT TO CLOSE THE DOOR, BUT TO OPEN IT: The Ambiguity of Recovery; CONCLUSION. This Thing Has Consumed American Politics for Years; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index

Fewer Americans were captured or missing during the Vietnam War than in any previous major military conflict in U.S. history. Yet despite their small numbers, American POWs inspired an outpouring of concern that slowly eroded support for the war. Michael J. Allen reveals how wartime loss transformed U.S. politics well before, and long after, the war's official end.Throughout the war's last years and in the decades since, Allen argues, the effort to recover lost warriors was as much a means to establish responsibility for their loss as it was a search for answers about their fate. Thoug

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

While there is no shortage of works on the Vietnam War, Allen (history, Northwestern Univ.) has managed to make a valuable, even unique, contribution to the field. Allen does a skillful job of explaining that even though there were fewer Americans captured or missing in the Vietnam War than in any other major American conflict, the response to the status of POWs and MIAs from Vietnam was so strong and so persistent it actually prolonged hostility between the United States and Vietnam and continued to affect American politics for decades after the war. Further, the effort was consumed by a small group made up of activists and the families of the missing or captured. Allen does an excellent job of describing the politics behind the efforts to recover the POWs and MIAs. VERDICT The book is skillfully written, very well researched, and wonderfully documented and presents a fair and balanced view of the issues presented. This is a scholarly work and would be an excellent supplementary text for college and university courses, and is appropriate for all who seek to understand the Vietnam War in a fuller context.-Lisa Ennis, Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Because the US lost the Vietnam War, US POWs became its only heroes. All the missing (MIAs) had to be accounted for; the living had to be returned regardless of time, cost, or improbability that any MIAs had survived a secret captivity in Southeast Asia. This complex book addresses these controversial issues as it develops a critical history of the National League of Families of POWs and MIAs. Evolving from initial concern for live prisoners during the war to proponents of a new conspiracy theory after it, the league seized enormous power, especially during the Reagan administration. It consistently asserted that live prisoners were kept in Southeast Asia, supported bizarre paramilitarism for their recovery, and insisted that the US government had lied to Americans by only excavating remains. Allen (Northwestern Univ.) shows how and why presidents, legislators, and generals accommodated the league's politics in a succession of administrations until the McCain-Kerry commission brought its outrageous beliefs and actions to light in 1991. Normalization of relations with the Socialist Republic of Vietnam in 1995 defeated the league's populist political agenda, but the author insists that the shadow of the Vietnam War will remain with us forever. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. R. C. Doyle Franciscan University of Steubenville

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