Lincoln on Race and Slavery.

By: Gates, Henry Louis, JrContributor(s): Yacovone, DonaldMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (416 p.)ISBN: 9781400832088Subject(s): Lincoln, Abraham, --1809-1865 --Political and social views | Lincoln, Abraham, --1809-1865 --Relations with African Americans | Lincoln, Abraham, --1809-1865 --Views on slavery | Slavery --United States --History --19th century --Sources | Slaves --Emancipation --United States --Sources | United States --Race relations --History --19th century --SourcesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Lincoln on Race and SlaveryDDC classification: 973.7092 LOC classification: E457.2.L744 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Abraham Lincoln on Race and Slavery; 1 Protest in Illinois Legislature on Slavery March 3, 1837; 2 Address Before theY oung Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois January 27, 1838; 3 AL to Mary Speed September 27, 1841; 4 Temperance Address February 22, 1842; 5 AL to Williamson Durley October 3, 1845; 6 AL to Josephus Hewett February 13, 1848; 7 Speech at Worcester, Massachusetts September 12, 1848
8 Remarks and Resolution Introduced in United States House of Representatives Concerning Abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia January 10, 18499 Eulogy on Henry Clay & January 4, 1855, Outline for Speech to the Colonization Society July 6, 1852; 10 H on A Lincoln's Address, Before the Springfield Scott Club , in Reply to Judge Douglas' Richmond Speech August 14 and 26, 1852; 11 Fragments on Slavery July 1, 1854; 12 Speech at Bloomington, Illinois September 12, 1854; 13 Speech at Peoria, Illinois October 16, 1854; 14 AL to Ichabod Codding November 27, 1854
15 AL to Owen Lovejoy August 11, 185516 AL to George Robertson August 15, 1855; 17 AL to Joshua F. Speed August 24, 1855; 18 Speech at Kalamazoo, Michigan August 27, 1856; 19 AL to Newton Deming and George P. Strong May 25, 1857; 20 Speech at Springfield, Illinois June 26, 1857; 21 A House Divided, Speech at Springfield, Illinois June 16, 1858; 22 AL to John L. Scripps June 23, 1858; 23 Fragment on the Struggle Against Slavery July, 1858; 24 Speech at C hicago, Illinois July 10, 1858; 25 Speech at Springfield, Illinois July 17, 1858; 26 Speech at Lewistown, Illinois August 17, 1858
27 First Debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Ottawa, Illinois August 21, 185828 Second Debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Freeport, Illinois August 27, 1858; 29 Speech at Carlinville, Illinois August 31, 1858; 30 Speech at Clinton, Illinois September 2, 1858; 31 Speech at Edwardsville, Illinois September 11, 1858; 32 Fourth Debate with Stephen A. Douglas September 18, 1858; 33 Fragment on Pro-slavery Theology October 1, 1858; 34 Seventh and Last Debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Alton, Illinois, & October 18, 1858, AL to James N. Brown October 15, 1858; 35 AL to Salmon P. Chase June 9, 1859
36 Speech at Columbus, Ohio September 16, 185937 Speech at Cincinnati, Ohio September 17, 1859; 38 Fragment on Free Labor September 17, 1859; 39 Address at the Cooper Institute, New York City February 27, 1860; 40 Speech at Hartford, Connecticut March 5, 1860; 41 AL to John A. Gilmer December 15, 1860; 42 First Inaugural Address March 4, 1861; 43 AL to Orville H. Browning September 22, 1861; 44 Message to Congress March 6, 1862; 45 AL to James A. McDougall March 14, 1862; 46 AL to Horace Greeley & April 16, 1862, Message to Congress March 24, 1862
47 Appeal to Border State Representatives to Favor Compensated Emancipation July 12, 1862
Summary: Generations of Americans have debated the meaning of Abraham Lincoln's views on race and slavery. He issued the Emancipation Proclamation and supported a constitutional amendment to outlaw slavery, yet he also harbored grave doubts about the intellectual capacity of African Americans, publicly used the n-word until at least 1862, and favored permanent racial segregation. In this book--the first complete collection of Lincoln's important writings on both race and slavery--readers can explore these contradictions through Lincoln's own words. Acclaimed Harvard scholar and documentary filmmaker
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Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Abraham Lincoln on Race and Slavery; 1 Protest in Illinois Legislature on Slavery March 3, 1837; 2 Address Before theY oung Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois January 27, 1838; 3 AL to Mary Speed September 27, 1841; 4 Temperance Address February 22, 1842; 5 AL to Williamson Durley October 3, 1845; 6 AL to Josephus Hewett February 13, 1848; 7 Speech at Worcester, Massachusetts September 12, 1848

8 Remarks and Resolution Introduced in United States House of Representatives Concerning Abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia January 10, 18499 Eulogy on Henry Clay & January 4, 1855, Outline for Speech to the Colonization Society July 6, 1852; 10 H on A Lincoln's Address, Before the Springfield Scott Club , in Reply to Judge Douglas' Richmond Speech August 14 and 26, 1852; 11 Fragments on Slavery July 1, 1854; 12 Speech at Bloomington, Illinois September 12, 1854; 13 Speech at Peoria, Illinois October 16, 1854; 14 AL to Ichabod Codding November 27, 1854

15 AL to Owen Lovejoy August 11, 185516 AL to George Robertson August 15, 1855; 17 AL to Joshua F. Speed August 24, 1855; 18 Speech at Kalamazoo, Michigan August 27, 1856; 19 AL to Newton Deming and George P. Strong May 25, 1857; 20 Speech at Springfield, Illinois June 26, 1857; 21 A House Divided, Speech at Springfield, Illinois June 16, 1858; 22 AL to John L. Scripps June 23, 1858; 23 Fragment on the Struggle Against Slavery July, 1858; 24 Speech at C hicago, Illinois July 10, 1858; 25 Speech at Springfield, Illinois July 17, 1858; 26 Speech at Lewistown, Illinois August 17, 1858

27 First Debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Ottawa, Illinois August 21, 185828 Second Debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Freeport, Illinois August 27, 1858; 29 Speech at Carlinville, Illinois August 31, 1858; 30 Speech at Clinton, Illinois September 2, 1858; 31 Speech at Edwardsville, Illinois September 11, 1858; 32 Fourth Debate with Stephen A. Douglas September 18, 1858; 33 Fragment on Pro-slavery Theology October 1, 1858; 34 Seventh and Last Debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Alton, Illinois, & October 18, 1858, AL to James N. Brown October 15, 1858; 35 AL to Salmon P. Chase June 9, 1859

36 Speech at Columbus, Ohio September 16, 185937 Speech at Cincinnati, Ohio September 17, 1859; 38 Fragment on Free Labor September 17, 1859; 39 Address at the Cooper Institute, New York City February 27, 1860; 40 Speech at Hartford, Connecticut March 5, 1860; 41 AL to John A. Gilmer December 15, 1860; 42 First Inaugural Address March 4, 1861; 43 AL to Orville H. Browning September 22, 1861; 44 Message to Congress March 6, 1862; 45 AL to James A. McDougall March 14, 1862; 46 AL to Horace Greeley & April 16, 1862, Message to Congress March 24, 1862

47 Appeal to Border State Representatives to Favor Compensated Emancipation July 12, 1862

Generations of Americans have debated the meaning of Abraham Lincoln's views on race and slavery. He issued the Emancipation Proclamation and supported a constitutional amendment to outlaw slavery, yet he also harbored grave doubts about the intellectual capacity of African Americans, publicly used the n-word until at least 1862, and favored permanent racial segregation. In this book--the first complete collection of Lincoln's important writings on both race and slavery--readers can explore these contradictions through Lincoln's own words. Acclaimed Harvard scholar and documentary filmmaker

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. , is the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Donald Yacovone has written and edited a number of books, including Freedom's Journey: African American Voices of the Civil War .

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