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Emancipating New York : The Politics of Slavery and Freedom, 1777-1827

By: Gellman, David N.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Antislavery, Abolition, and the Atlantic World: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (312 p.).ISBN: 9780807134658.Subject(s): Abolitionists -- Political activity -- New York (State) | Antislavery movements -- New York (State) -- History | New York (State) -- Politics and government --1775-1865 | New York (State) -- Race relations | Slaves -- Emancipation -- New York (State)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Emancipating New York : The Politics of Slavery and Freedom, 1777–1827DDC classification: 306.36209747 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; I. NO EXIT; 1. Labor, Law, and Resistance in the Eighteenth Century; 2. Unfished Revolutions; II. INDENTITIES; 3. 1785: The Road Not Taken; 4. Containing Slavery: The Manumission Society and the Law, 1785-92; 5. Pirates, Sugar, Debtors, and Federalists: The Paradoxes of Antislavery Political Economy; 6. Race, Citizenship, Sentiment, and the Construction of an Antislavery Public Sphere; 7. Slavery and the Politics of Upheaval: The 1790s; 8. Ambiguous Victory: Gradual Abolition Becomes Law; III. REFLECTIONS
9. Freedom, Slavery, Memory, and Modernity, 1800-27Epilogue: Inescapable; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; X
Summary: An innovative blend of cultural and political history, Emancipating New York is the most complete study to date of the abolition of slavery in New York state. Focusing on public opinion, David N. Gellman shows New Yorkers engaged in vigorous debates and determined activism during the final decades of the eighteenth century as they grappled with the possibility of freeing the state's black population. The gradual emancipation that began in New York in 1799 helped move an entire region of the country toward a historically rare slaveless democracy, creating a wedge in the United States that would
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E445.N56 G45 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=483255 Available EBL483255

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; I. NO EXIT; 1. Labor, Law, and Resistance in the Eighteenth Century; 2. Unfished Revolutions; II. INDENTITIES; 3. 1785: The Road Not Taken; 4. Containing Slavery: The Manumission Society and the Law, 1785-92; 5. Pirates, Sugar, Debtors, and Federalists: The Paradoxes of Antislavery Political Economy; 6. Race, Citizenship, Sentiment, and the Construction of an Antislavery Public Sphere; 7. Slavery and the Politics of Upheaval: The 1790s; 8. Ambiguous Victory: Gradual Abolition Becomes Law; III. REFLECTIONS

9. Freedom, Slavery, Memory, and Modernity, 1800-27Epilogue: Inescapable; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; X

An innovative blend of cultural and political history, Emancipating New York is the most complete study to date of the abolition of slavery in New York state. Focusing on public opinion, David N. Gellman shows New Yorkers engaged in vigorous debates and determined activism during the final decades of the eighteenth century as they grappled with the possibility of freeing the state's black population. The gradual emancipation that began in New York in 1799 helped move an entire region of the country toward a historically rare slaveless democracy, creating a wedge in the United States that would

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In 1799, New York's legislature passed a gradual abolition law that placed slavery on the course to extinction. Later legislative action would make total abolition complete by 1827. Gellman (DePauw Univ.) examines both the process of the abolition of slavery in New York and the larger discourses of political economy, race, and citizenship that surrounded it. In his exhaustively researched and well-written account, Gellman details the impact of Revolutionary ideals upon slavery and its place in New York's society. Ultimately, he concludes, enough New Yorkers--prodded by reformers and by larger transformations of economy and demography--believed that slavery no longer had a place in their society. This was a complicated process, however, with an ambiguous conclusion. Racism persisted and became even more entrenched in New York, seen most clearly in the 1821 state constitution's effective disfranchisement of blacks. Gellman's book is one of the few treatments of "first emancipation" in the North and the most thorough study of abolition in New York. This is an important book; students of the antebellum US, as well as of race, slavery, and abolition, will read it with great profit. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. K. M. Gannon Grand View College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>David N. Gellman is coeditor of Jim Crow New York: A Documentary History of Race and Citizenship, 1777-1877 and associate professor of history at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana.</p>

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