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Germans into Jews : Remaking the Jewish Social Body in the Weimar Republic

By: Gillerman, Sharon.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Stanford Studies in Jewish History and C: Publisher: Palo Alto : Stanford University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (250 p.).ISBN: 9780804771405.Subject(s): Jews -- Germany -- Charities -- History | Jews - Germany - Charities - History | Jews -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Jews - Germany - History - 20th century | Jews -- Germany -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Jews - Germany - Social conditions - 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Germans into Jews : Remaking the Jewish Social Body in the Weimar RepublicDDC classification: 305.892/404309042 | 305.892404309042 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; 1. "As the Family Goes, So Goes the Nation"; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 2. Constructing a Jewish Body Politic: Declining Fertility and the Development of a Jewish Population Policy; 3. "A Little State Within a Larger One": The Expansion of Jewish Welfare During the Weimar Republic; 4. Rescuing "Endangered Youth": Youth Welfare and the Project of Bourgeois Social Reform; 5. Trauma and Transference: War Orphans Shape a New Jewish Nation; Conclusion; List of Abbreviations; Notes; Select Bibliography; Index
Summary: Germans into Jews turns to an often overlooked and misunderstood period of German and Jewish history-the years between the world wars. It has been assumed that the Jewish community in Germany was in decline during the Weimar Republic. But, Sharon Gillerman demonstrates that Weimar Jews sought to rejuvenate and reconfigure their community as a means both of strengthening the German nation and of creating a more expansive and autonomous Jewish entity within the German state. These ambitious projects to increase fertility, expand welfare, and strengthen the family transcended the ideo
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS134.25 G555 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=483432 Available EBL483432

Contents; 1. "As the Family Goes, So Goes the Nation"; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 2. Constructing a Jewish Body Politic: Declining Fertility and the Development of a Jewish Population Policy; 3. "A Little State Within a Larger One": The Expansion of Jewish Welfare During the Weimar Republic; 4. Rescuing "Endangered Youth": Youth Welfare and the Project of Bourgeois Social Reform; 5. Trauma and Transference: War Orphans Shape a New Jewish Nation; Conclusion; List of Abbreviations; Notes; Select Bibliography; Index

Germans into Jews turns to an often overlooked and misunderstood period of German and Jewish history-the years between the world wars. It has been assumed that the Jewish community in Germany was in decline during the Weimar Republic. But, Sharon Gillerman demonstrates that Weimar Jews sought to rejuvenate and reconfigure their community as a means both of strengthening the German nation and of creating a more expansive and autonomous Jewish entity within the German state. These ambitious projects to increase fertility, expand welfare, and strengthen the family transcended the ideo

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Gillerman's sophisticated analysis of the "Jewish social body" in Weimar Germany joins an increasing number of works that treat German history as it was (not as a stepping-stone to the collapse of liberalism and the rise of National Socialism), and the history of German Jewry apart from the Holocaust. Specifically, the author (Hebrew Union College) presents the interesting story of how Jewish social workers during Weimar worked to revitalize the country's Jewish community after the Great War by transforming individuals' health, facilitating reproduction and child care, and rehabilitating endangered youth. Merging established Jewish communal traditions of charity and self-help with modern social policy, social reformers sought to connect the individual, the family, and Germany's larger Jewish community to the nation-state. Heightened anti-Semitism, Gillerman maintains, inspired Weimar Jews toward greater ethnic cohesiveness and communal autonomy, but without renouncing their German identity and legal rights. While the economic crisis of 1930 essentially ended earlier Jewish leaders' efforts at community building, the newly organized Jewish social welfare system helped meet the pressing needs of economic subsistence and later the Jewish struggle for existence under the Nazis. Summing Up: Recommended. For all college and university collections. J. D. Smith University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sharon Gillerman is Associate Professor of Jewish History at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Los Angeles and adjunct Associate Professor of History at the University of Southern California.

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