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Reconsidering Roosevelt on Race : How the Presidency Paved the Road to Brown

By: McMahon, Kevin J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (310 p.).ISBN: 9780226561127.Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | African Americans - Civil rights - History - 20th century | African Americans -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- History -- 20th century | African Americans - Legal status, laws, etc. - History - 20th century | Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945 -- Relations with African Americans | Segregation in education -- Law and legislation -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945 | United States -- Race relations -- Political aspects | United States - Race relations - Political aspects | United States. Supreme Court -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reconsidering Roosevelt on Race : How the Presidency Paved the Road to BrownDDC classification: 323.1/196073/009043 | 323.1196073009043 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction: The Day They Drove Old Dixie Down; 2. The Incongruities of Reform: Rights-Centered Liberalism and Legal Realism in the Early New Deal Years; 3. FDR's Constitutional Vision and the Defeat of the Court-Packing Plan: The Modern Presidency and the Enemies of Institutional Reform; 4. "Approving Legislation for the People, Preserving Liberties-Almost Rewriting Laws"": The Politics of Creating the Roosevelt Court; 5. A Constitutional Purge: Southern Democracy, Lynch Law, and the Roosevelt Justice Department
6. The Commitment Continues: Truman, Eisenhower, and the Civil Rights Decisions7. Conclusion: The Road the Court Trod; Notes; Works Cited; Index
Summary: Many have questioned FDR's record on race, suggesting that he had the opportunity but not the will to advance the civil rights of African Americans. Kevin J. McMahon challenges this view, arguing instead that Roosevelt's administration played a crucial role in the Supreme Court's increasing commitment to racial equality-which culminated in its landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education.McMahon shows how FDR's attempt to strengthen the presidency and undermine the power of conservative Southern Democrats dovetailed with his efforts to seek racial equality through the f
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E807 .M363 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=496628 Available EBL496628

Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction: The Day They Drove Old Dixie Down; 2. The Incongruities of Reform: Rights-Centered Liberalism and Legal Realism in the Early New Deal Years; 3. FDR's Constitutional Vision and the Defeat of the Court-Packing Plan: The Modern Presidency and the Enemies of Institutional Reform; 4. "Approving Legislation for the People, Preserving Liberties-Almost Rewriting Laws"": The Politics of Creating the Roosevelt Court; 5. A Constitutional Purge: Southern Democracy, Lynch Law, and the Roosevelt Justice Department

6. The Commitment Continues: Truman, Eisenhower, and the Civil Rights Decisions7. Conclusion: The Road the Court Trod; Notes; Works Cited; Index

Many have questioned FDR's record on race, suggesting that he had the opportunity but not the will to advance the civil rights of African Americans. Kevin J. McMahon challenges this view, arguing instead that Roosevelt's administration played a crucial role in the Supreme Court's increasing commitment to racial equality-which culminated in its landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education.McMahon shows how FDR's attempt to strengthen the presidency and undermine the power of conservative Southern Democrats dovetailed with his efforts to seek racial equality through the f

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The famous Brown decision of 1954 has long been the subject of intense debate. More recently, scholars have sought to locate the origins of the liberal court that handed down the Brown decision and to reconsider the role of Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman in shaping that court. McMahon (political science, SUNY Fredonia) concedes that FDR often failed to openly support measures that would benefit African Americans because he feared offending the powerful southern wing of the Democratic Party, whose support he needed to pass any New Deal legislation. FDR's court-packing scheme was an effort to "modernize" government, and he worked behind the scenes to destabilize white supremacy in the South. Roosevelt urged the Justice Department to prosecute the Classic case (1941), which involved a primary election (as distinct from a general election). This victory paved the way for a later case that invalidated the white primary and expanded the scope of federal jurisdiction. FDR privately supported anti-lynching legislation and legislation to abolish the poll tax (1942), and directed his Justice Department to establish a Civil Liberties Unit, later renamed the Civil Rights Section. An important contribution to legal history. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. W. Glasker Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kevin J. McMahon is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the State University of New York, Fredonia.

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