Rousseau and Freedom.

By: McDonald, ChristieContributor(s): Hoffmann, StanleyMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (328 p.)ISBN: 9780511722967Subject(s): Electronic books. -- local | Free will and determinism | Liberty -- Philosophy | Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, -- 1712-1778 -- Criticism and interpretationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Rousseau and FreedomDDC classification: 848/.509 LOC classification: PQ2053 -- .R567 2010ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Illustration -- Notes on contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviation -- Introduction -- Part I -- Chapter 1 Freeing man from sin: Rousseau on the natural condition of mankind -- Natural man -- Two varieties of misanthropy -- A Discourse of Inequality -- Legislating for mankind -- Notes -- Chapter 2 Making history natural in Rousseau's discourse on the origins of Inequality -- Rousseau's critique of natural law -- Not just a notion: a correct notion -- "La moins avancée de toutes les connaissances"
The uses and misuses of natural knowledge -- Rousseau's provisional authorization -- Notes -- Chapter 3 Rousseau's Second Discourse: between Epicureanism and Stoicism -- Notes -- Chapter 4 Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Diderot in the late 1740s: satire, friendship, and freedom -- Friendship and a book -- Political arithmetic -- Friendship and satire -- Political economy -- Notes -- Chapter 5 If you please! Theater, verisimilitude, and freedom in the Letter to d'Alembert -- The Object of the Letter to d'Alembert -- Imputation and the subjugation of religious conscience
Verisimilitude and the subjugation of poetic faith -- Participation, if you please -- Notes -- Chapter 6 Music, the passions, and political freedom in Rousseau -- Notes -- Part II -- Chapter 7 The Social Contract, or the mirage of the general will -- Notes -- Chapter 8 "Par le bon usage de ma liberté": freedom and Rousseau's reconstituted Christianity -- Traditional Christianity and the question of freedom -- The problem of mediation -- Original sin -- Rousseau's revised Christianity -- Autonomy -- Immediacy -- Simplicity -- Utility -- Rousseau's revised Christianity and the religion civile
Notes -- Chapter 9 The constraints of liberty at the scene of instruction -- Liberty and education -- The circulation of knowledge: Emile and Telemachus -- The post-pedagogical sphere -- Notes -- Chapter 10 "Toutes mes idées sont en images": Rousseau and the yoke of necessity -- Writing for the prejudiced -- Judging politics as nonpolitics -- The yoke of the virtuous man -- Notes -- Chapter 11 Rousseau's ruins -- Glorious ruins: the Pont du Gard -- Derelict ruins: the Arena at Nîmes -- Modernity as ruin -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Chapter 12 Can woman be free? -- Notes
Chapter 13 The subject and its body: love of oneself and freedom in the thought of Rousseau -- Duties to oneself -- Ownership of self: Locke and Rousseau -- Discussions of suicide -- Liberty and affect -- Liberty and the feeling of love -- Liberty and solitude: the reverie -- Negative liberty / positive liberty: the virtuous circle -- Notes -- Part III -- Chapter 14 Paranoia and freedom in Rousseau's final decade -- Notes -- Chapter 15 Freedom and the project of idleness -- Reveries of laziness: on freeing the soul -- Notes -- Chapter 16 On the uses of negative freedom -- Les solitaires
Negative freedom
Summary: Debates about freedom, an ideal continually contested, were first set out in their modern version by the eighteenth-century French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau. His ideas and analyses were taken up during the philosophical enlightenment, often invoked during the French Revolution, and still resonate in contemporary discussions of freedom. This volume, first published in 2010, examines Rousseau's many approaches to the concept of freedom, in the context of his thought on literature, religion, music, theater, women, the body, and the arts. Its expert contributors cross disciplinary frontiers to develop thought-provoking new angles on Rousseau's thought. By taking freedom as the guiding principle of their analysis, the essays form a cohesive account of Rousseau's writings.
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Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Illustration -- Notes on contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Abbreviation -- Introduction -- Part I -- Chapter 1 Freeing man from sin: Rousseau on the natural condition of mankind -- Natural man -- Two varieties of misanthropy -- A Discourse of Inequality -- Legislating for mankind -- Notes -- Chapter 2 Making history natural in Rousseau's discourse on the origins of Inequality -- Rousseau's critique of natural law -- Not just a notion: a correct notion -- "La moins avancée de toutes les connaissances"

The uses and misuses of natural knowledge -- Rousseau's provisional authorization -- Notes -- Chapter 3 Rousseau's Second Discourse: between Epicureanism and Stoicism -- Notes -- Chapter 4 Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Diderot in the late 1740s: satire, friendship, and freedom -- Friendship and a book -- Political arithmetic -- Friendship and satire -- Political economy -- Notes -- Chapter 5 If you please! Theater, verisimilitude, and freedom in the Letter to d'Alembert -- The Object of the Letter to d'Alembert -- Imputation and the subjugation of religious conscience

Verisimilitude and the subjugation of poetic faith -- Participation, if you please -- Notes -- Chapter 6 Music, the passions, and political freedom in Rousseau -- Notes -- Part II -- Chapter 7 The Social Contract, or the mirage of the general will -- Notes -- Chapter 8 "Par le bon usage de ma liberté": freedom and Rousseau's reconstituted Christianity -- Traditional Christianity and the question of freedom -- The problem of mediation -- Original sin -- Rousseau's revised Christianity -- Autonomy -- Immediacy -- Simplicity -- Utility -- Rousseau's revised Christianity and the religion civile

Notes -- Chapter 9 The constraints of liberty at the scene of instruction -- Liberty and education -- The circulation of knowledge: Emile and Telemachus -- The post-pedagogical sphere -- Notes -- Chapter 10 "Toutes mes idées sont en images": Rousseau and the yoke of necessity -- Writing for the prejudiced -- Judging politics as nonpolitics -- The yoke of the virtuous man -- Notes -- Chapter 11 Rousseau's ruins -- Glorious ruins: the Pont du Gard -- Derelict ruins: the Arena at Nîmes -- Modernity as ruin -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Chapter 12 Can woman be free? -- Notes

Chapter 13 The subject and its body: love of oneself and freedom in the thought of Rousseau -- Duties to oneself -- Ownership of self: Locke and Rousseau -- Discussions of suicide -- Liberty and affect -- Liberty and the feeling of love -- Liberty and solitude: the reverie -- Negative liberty / positive liberty: the virtuous circle -- Notes -- Part III -- Chapter 14 Paranoia and freedom in Rousseau's final decade -- Notes -- Chapter 15 Freedom and the project of idleness -- Reveries of laziness: on freeing the soul -- Notes -- Chapter 16 On the uses of negative freedom -- Les solitaires

Negative freedom

Debates about freedom, an ideal continually contested, were first set out in their modern version by the eighteenth-century French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau. His ideas and analyses were taken up during the philosophical enlightenment, often invoked during the French Revolution, and still resonate in contemporary discussions of freedom. This volume, first published in 2010, examines Rousseau's many approaches to the concept of freedom, in the context of his thought on literature, religion, music, theater, women, the body, and the arts. Its expert contributors cross disciplinary frontiers to develop thought-provoking new angles on Rousseau's thought. By taking freedom as the guiding principle of their analysis, the essays form a cohesive account of Rousseau's writings.

Description based upon print version of record.

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