Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Populist Vision.

By: Postel, Charles.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, USA, 2009Description: 1 online resource (794 p.).ISBN: 9780199726219.Subject(s): Capitalism -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Farmers -- Political activity -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Middle class -- Political activity -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Populism -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Social movements -- United States -- History -- 19th century | United States -- Economic conditions -- 1865-1918 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1900 | United States -- Social conditions -- 1865-1918 | Working class -- Political activity -- United States -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Populist VisionDDC classification: 973.8 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover Page; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Preface; Acknowledgments; Contents; Illustrations; Introduction Modern Times; Part I Farmers; 1 Push and Energy; 2 Knowledge and Power; 3 A Better Woman; 4 A Farmers' Trust; Part II Populists; 5 Business Politics; 6 Race Progress; 7 Confederation; 8 Shrine of Science; 9 Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In the late nineteenth century, monumental technological innovations like the telegraph and steam power made America and the world a much smaller place. New technologies also made possible large-scale organization and centralization. Corporations grew exponentially and the rich amassed great fortunes. Those on the short end of these wrenching changes responded in the Populist revolt, one of the most effective challenges to corporate power in American history. But what did Populism represent? Half a century ago, scholars such as Richard Hofstadter portrayed the Populist movement as an irrationa
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E661 .P67 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=510303 Available EBL510303

Cover Page; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Preface; Acknowledgments; Contents; Illustrations; Introduction Modern Times; Part I Farmers; 1 Push and Energy; 2 Knowledge and Power; 3 A Better Woman; 4 A Farmers' Trust; Part II Populists; 5 Business Politics; 6 Race Progress; 7 Confederation; 8 Shrine of Science; 9 Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In the late nineteenth century, monumental technological innovations like the telegraph and steam power made America and the world a much smaller place. New technologies also made possible large-scale organization and centralization. Corporations grew exponentially and the rich amassed great fortunes. Those on the short end of these wrenching changes responded in the Populist revolt, one of the most effective challenges to corporate power in American history. But what did Populism represent? Half a century ago, scholars such as Richard Hofstadter portrayed the Populist movement as an irrationa

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Postel (California State Univ., Sacramento) has written a major reassessment of the Populists, the most powerful independent political movement in US history. The Populists were not a typical political party, but a coalition of farmers' associations, labor organizations, women's groups, and an assortment of urban bohemians. This alliance, having grown increasingly disaffected with the protracted industrial and agrarian crises of the 1880s and 1890s, did not seek to overthrow democratic government, only to reform it by regulating the new corporate order and redistributing personal and corporate wealth. Over the years, the Populists have been disparaged for being a tradition-bound resistance movement. Dedicated to protecting family, community, and traditional values, they have been accused of refusing to embrace a modern and commercial society along with the enlightened ideals of innovation and progress. Postel convincingly argues that the Populists have been misinterpreted. Populists not only viewed the modern world through materialist lens, but also embraced the market revolution and used the technological, organizational, and ideological innovations of the Gilded Age to create an alternative modernity consistent with their reformist aspirations. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. P. G. Connors Michigan Senate Majority Policy Office

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.