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America and the Pill : A History of Promise, Peril, and Liberation

By: May, Elaine Tyler.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Basic Books, 2010Description: 1 online resource (225 p.).ISBN: 9780465021543.Subject(s): Birth control - United States - History | Birth control -- United States -- History | Oral contraceptives - Social aspects - United States - History | Oral contraceptives -- Social aspects -- United States -- History | Women - United States - Social conditions - 20th century | Women -- United States -- Social conditions -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: America and the Pill : A History of Promise, Peril, and LiberationDDC classification: 363.9/60973 | 363.960973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; Introduction; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; Conclusion; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; NOTES; INDEX
Summary: A revealing new look at the groundbreaking form of contraception that enabled women to control their lives and transform the world
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ766.5.U5M39 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=515513 Available EBL515513

CONTENTS; Introduction; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; Conclusion; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; NOTES; INDEX

A revealing new look at the groundbreaking form of contraception that enabled women to control their lives and transform the world

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the introduction of the birth control pill to the American market, May (American studies & history, Univ. of Minnesota) explores its development and its acceptance into American society, becoming a standard in contraception and women's health management. Although she includes pharmacological background on research and development, May's focus is on the political and cultural implications of the pill within American society. Using archival research and oral interviews, she shows that the pill has been used as an instrument of empowerment for women. As a tool in arguments over population control, family planning, and feminism, the pill has had unanticipated implications for gender, class, race, and economic status. Compared with several other recently published scholarly and popular works on women's menstrual management, May's is the most comprehensive regarding the birth control pill itself and contraception. It serves as a good companion to Lara Friedenfeld's The Modern Period: Menstruation in Twentieth-Century America. VERDICT Recommended for both general popular culture collections and academic libraries supporting a gender studies program.-Kate Wells, Armstrong Atlantic State Univ. Lib., Savannah, GA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Oral birth control medication, known to a generation of Americans as "The Pill," became available in 1960. May (Univ. of Minnesota) constructs a historical overview of The Pill for its golden anniversary. She also wrote in honor of her father, Dr. Edward Tyler, head of the Planned Parenthood clinic in Los Angeles and a clinical researcher who was a key figure in the FDA approval process. The Pill began as a dream of radical women's rights advocates such as Emma Goldman, who believed women could not find freedom and self-determination without gaining control of their fertility. Development was pushed through by Margaret Sanger and funded by Katherine McCormick in the 1950s as researchers dreamed of controlling world population and creating universal peace and prosperity. May's central argument is that as women's liberation leaders and ordinary women took control of The Pill and made demands for addressing safety issues, the small pill became a large force for women's emancipation in the late 1960s and 1970s. This useful overview adds little new information to the history and controversies of birth control. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers and lower-division undergraduates. S. D. Reschly Truman State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elaine Tyler May is Regents Professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of several books, including Homeward Bound and Barren in the Promised Land . She has contributed to Ms. , the Los Angeles Times , the New York Times , and more. She was the 2009-2010 President of the Organization of American Historians. She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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