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Upbuilding Black Durham : Gender, Class, and Black Community Development in the Jim Crow South

By: Brown, Leslie.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (468 p.).ISBN: 9780807877531.Subject(s): African American women -- North Carolina -- Durham -- History | African Americans -- North Carolina -- Durham -- Biography | African Americans -- North Carolina -- Durham -- History | African Americans -- North Carolina -- Durham -- Social conditions | Community life -- North Carolina -- Durham -- History | Durham (N.C.) -- Race relations | Durham (N.C.) -- Social conditions | Sex role -- North Carolina -- Durham -- History | Social change -- North Carolina -- Durham -- History | Social classes -- North Carolina -- Durham -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Upbuilding Black Durham : Gender, Class, and Black Community Development in the Jim Crow SouthDDC classification: 975.656300496 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Prologue; Introduction; 1 Seek Out a Good Place: Making Decisions in Freedom; 2 Durham's Narrow Escape: Gendering Race Politics; 3 Many Important Particulars Are Far from Flattering: The Gender Dimensions of the ''Negro Problem''; 4 We Have Great Faith in Luck, but Infinitely More in Pluck: Gender and the Making of a New Black Elite; 5 We Need to Be as Close Friends as Possible: Gender, Race, and the Politics of Upbuilding; A section of photographs; 6 Helping to Win This War: Gender and Class on the Home Front
7 Every Wise Woman Buildeth Her House: Gender and the Paradox of the Capital of the Black Middle Class8 There Should Be . . . No Discrimination: Gender, Class, and Activism in the New Deal Era; 9 Plenty of Opposition Which Is Growing Daily: Gender, Generation, and the Long Civil Rights Movement; Conclusion; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In the 1910s, both W. E. B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington praised the black community in Durham, North Carolina, for its exceptional race progress. Migration, urbanization, and industrialization had turned black Durham from a post-Civil War liberation community into the ""capital of the black middle class."" African Americans owned and operated mills, factories, churches, schools, and an array of retail services, shops, community organizations, and race institutions. Using interviews, narratives, and family stories, Leslie Brown animates the history of this remarkable city from emancipation
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F264.D9 .B83 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=515679 Available EBL515679

Contents; Acknowledgments; Prologue; Introduction; 1 Seek Out a Good Place: Making Decisions in Freedom; 2 Durham's Narrow Escape: Gendering Race Politics; 3 Many Important Particulars Are Far from Flattering: The Gender Dimensions of the ''Negro Problem''; 4 We Have Great Faith in Luck, but Infinitely More in Pluck: Gender and the Making of a New Black Elite; 5 We Need to Be as Close Friends as Possible: Gender, Race, and the Politics of Upbuilding; A section of photographs; 6 Helping to Win This War: Gender and Class on the Home Front

7 Every Wise Woman Buildeth Her House: Gender and the Paradox of the Capital of the Black Middle Class8 There Should Be . . . No Discrimination: Gender, Class, and Activism in the New Deal Era; 9 Plenty of Opposition Which Is Growing Daily: Gender, Generation, and the Long Civil Rights Movement; Conclusion; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In the 1910s, both W. E. B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington praised the black community in Durham, North Carolina, for its exceptional race progress. Migration, urbanization, and industrialization had turned black Durham from a post-Civil War liberation community into the ""capital of the black middle class."" African Americans owned and operated mills, factories, churches, schools, and an array of retail services, shops, community organizations, and race institutions. Using interviews, narratives, and family stories, Leslie Brown animates the history of this remarkable city from emancipation

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Built on the tobacco industry and the development of the New South, Durham, North Carolina, was christened by E. Franklin Frazier the "capital of the black middle class." This insightful book portrays that and more. Durham's middle class was forged in response to post-Civil War migrations, Jim Crow, WW I, the Depression, and the initiation of the Civil Rights Movement. The development of middle-class Durham was profoundly affected by the role of women as they struggled not only to free themselves from the aftermath of slavery but also to redefine that role through work as teachers, nurses, and with the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company and varied civic organizations. Those roles (and gender-based domestic roles) gave women both positions of influence and leverage with whites, and that helped reshape the African American experience and Durham. Weaving biographical information and economic, social, and political history, Brown (Williams College) interprets Durham's local history and records and a vast secondary literature. The book is a study in community transformation and a commentary on gender, race, and class within the African American community. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. F. Armstrong Louisiana State University at Alexandria

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