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Andersonvilles of the North : The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners

By: Gillispie, James M.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Denton : University of North Texas Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (295 p.).ISBN: 9781574413700.Subject(s): Military prisons -- Middle West -- History -- 19th century | Military prisons -- Northeastern States -- History -- 19th century | Military prisons -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Prisoners of war -- Confederate States of America -- History -- 19th century | Prisoners of war -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Prisoners of war -- United States -- Mortality -- History -- 19th century | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Prisoners and prisons | United States. Army -- Prisons -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Andersonvilles of the North : The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate PrisonersDDC classification: 973.7/71 | 973.771 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Half Title; Title Page; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Servants of the Devil and Jeff Davis; 2. The Lost Cause and the Southern Side of the POW Debate; 3. Continuity and Change; 4. Union Policies Regarding Prisoners of War; Photo Section; 5. Federal Policies at the Four Major Prisons in Illinois and Indiana; 6. Federal Policies at the Major Ohio Prisons; 7. Point Lookout, Fort Delaware, and Elmira; 8. The Omnipresent Specter of Disease; Conclusion; Appendix A; Appendix B; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Argues that the image of Union prison officials as negligent and cruel to Confederate prisoners is severely flawed. This study presents a less negative, picture of Northern prison life.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E615 .G55 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=517524 Available EBL517524

Half Title; Title Page; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Servants of the Devil and Jeff Davis; 2. The Lost Cause and the Southern Side of the POW Debate; 3. Continuity and Change; 4. Union Policies Regarding Prisoners of War; Photo Section; 5. Federal Policies at the Four Major Prisons in Illinois and Indiana; 6. Federal Policies at the Major Ohio Prisons; 7. Point Lookout, Fort Delaware, and Elmira; 8. The Omnipresent Specter of Disease; Conclusion; Appendix A; Appendix B; Bibliography; Index

Argues that the image of Union prison officials as negligent and cruel to Confederate prisoners is severely flawed. This study presents a less negative, picture of Northern prison life.

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

The notorious Confederate camp at Andersonville, Georgia, became the symbol of harsh conditions suffered by prisoners of war (POWs) in the US Civil War. Pro-Southern memoirists, publicists, and historians have long insisted that many federal POW camps were at least as miserable and deadly as Andersonville. These included prisons at Alton, Fort Douglas, and Rock Island in Illinois; Johnson's Island and Camp Chase in Ohio; Point Lookout in Maryland; Fort Delaware in Delaware; and Elmira in New York. Gillispie (Sampson Community College, NC) examines literature devoted to each of these camps, especially so-called "Lost Cause" lamentations that federal authorities intentionally inflicted suffering and death on inmates by neglecting or denying proper shelter, food, and medical services. He acknowledges that POW life was unpleasant and that cases of maladministration occurred in specific camps, particularly regarding sanitation. However, the author uses official records to demonstrate that in each camp, federal authorities made good-faith efforts to sustain and protect their captives. Gillispie's sub-thesis denies that federal authorities ended the Dix-Cameron exchange cartel for military advantage. He shows that exchange negotiations ceased when Confederates refused to release black POWs. See also George Levy, To Die in Chicago (CH, Dec'94, 32-2346). Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. G. H. Davis emeritus, Georgia State University

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