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Women Between Two Worlds : Midlife Reflections on Work and Family

By: Dinnerstein, Myra.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Women In The Political Economy: Publisher: Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (248 p.).ISBN: 9781439904220.Subject(s): Married women -- Employment -- United States -- Case studies | Middle class women -- Employment -- United States -- Case studies | Work and family -- United States -- Case studiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women Between Two Worlds : Midlife Reflections on Work and FamilyDDC classification: 331.43/0973 | 331.430973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; Preface; Acknowledgments; Study Participants; CHAPTER I: Introduction; CHAPTER 2: Growing Up Female: The Possible and the Appropriate; CHAPTER 3: Becoming Adult Women; CHAPTER 4: At Home; CHAPTER 5: From Housewives to Career Women; CHAPTER 6: The Persistence of Domesticity; CHAPTER 7: Between Two Worlds; CHAPTER 8: Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Myra Dinnerstein examines the choices and compromises of a generation of women who came of age after World War II. Her in-depth study traces the experiences of twenty-two middle-class women from childhood to adulthood and their evolution from traditional wives and mothers to career women at midlife. Her richly detailed interviews explore the tensions of combining work, marriage, and family life and remind us of the significance of one''s social and personal context with respect to the ability to make satisfying choices.Middle-class women born between 1936 and 1944 have been split between two worlds. As they were growing up, traditional expectations and limited opportunities seemed to make marriage and motherhood inevitable choices. When they reached their thirties, the Women''s Movement and expanding opportunities in the workplace presented options for them that had not been available to their mothers. Now it was considered appropriate for women to have ambitions and to act on them--and the women described in this book were among those who did.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6055.2.U6 D566 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=534252 Available EBL534252

CONTENTS; Preface; Acknowledgments; Study Participants; CHAPTER I: Introduction; CHAPTER 2: Growing Up Female: The Possible and the Appropriate; CHAPTER 3: Becoming Adult Women; CHAPTER 4: At Home; CHAPTER 5: From Housewives to Career Women; CHAPTER 6: The Persistence of Domesticity; CHAPTER 7: Between Two Worlds; CHAPTER 8: Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Myra Dinnerstein examines the choices and compromises of a generation of women who came of age after World War II. Her in-depth study traces the experiences of twenty-two middle-class women from childhood to adulthood and their evolution from traditional wives and mothers to career women at midlife. Her richly detailed interviews explore the tensions of combining work, marriage, and family life and remind us of the significance of one''s social and personal context with respect to the ability to make satisfying choices.Middle-class women born between 1936 and 1944 have been split between two worlds. As they were growing up, traditional expectations and limited opportunities seemed to make marriage and motherhood inevitable choices. When they reached their thirties, the Women''s Movement and expanding opportunities in the workplace presented options for them that had not been available to their mothers. Now it was considered appropriate for women to have ambitions and to act on them--and the women described in this book were among those who did.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

People born between the late 1930s and early '40s were a transitional generation; their lives were affected by broad changes in women's paid work opportunities and in gender ideologies. This case study of 22 middle-class women describes differences: some were traditional college students, others were nontraditionalists; some adapted well to being homemakers with children, others felt stuck and suffered depression; some persuaded their husbands and children to share responsibilities, others capitulated to their families' demands. But they shared a common dilemma: when they chose to depart from the ideal stay-at-home-and-reproduce-babies role, it was solely up to them--on their own--to devise strategies and techniques to make it all work. Having decided to combine families and careers, these women were guaranteed success by their social and economic advantages. In a real sense, they had it all. They attended college, married, had children, stayed home for a time, and then resumed careers either by increasing their credentials or by simply re-entering the job market. Although the women in this study do not reflect the experiences of women of all colors and social classes, their stories of advantaged lives indicate that social change has not been as revolutionary as one would like to believe. General and undergraduate readers.

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