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Daisy Bates : Civil Rights Crusader from Arkansas

By: Stockley, Grif.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies: Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2005Description: 1 online resource (351 p.).ISBN: 9781604730678.Subject(s): African American women civil rights workers -- Arkansas -- Little Rock -- Biography | African Americans -- Arkansas -- Little Rock -- Biography | Arkansas -- Race relations | Bates, Daisy | Central High School (Little Rock, Ark.) | Civil rights movements -- Arkansas -- Little Rock -- History | Civil rights workers -- Arkansas -- Little Rock -- Biography | Little Rock (Ark.) -- Biography | Little Rock (Ark.) -- Race relations | School integration -- Arkansas -- Little Rock -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Daisy Bates : Civil Rights Crusader from ArkansasDDC classification: 323/.092 LOC classification: F419.L7 S76 2005Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. A Little Girl from Huttig; 2. A Much Older Man; 3. A Newspaper All Their Own; 4. Two for the Price of One; 5. An Unwavering Commitment; 6. The Bombshell of Brown v. Board of Education; 7. A Foot in the Schoolhouse Door; 8. Two Steps Back; 9. Front and Center; 10. Who Is That Woman in Little Rock?; 11. A Battle Every Day; 12. Woman of the Year; 13. Holding the Line; 14. Coping with Defeat; 15. The New York Years; 16. Going in Different Directions; 17. The Long Shadow of Little Rock; 18. Mitchellville-Self-Help or Monument?; 19. Fighting Over a Legend
NotesIndex
Summary: Daisy Bates (1914-1999) is renowned as the mentor of the Little Rock Nine, the first African Americans to attend Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. For guiding the Nine through one of the most tumultuous civil rights crises of the 1950s, she was selected as Woman of the Year in Education by the Associated Press in 1957 and was the only woman invited to speak at the Lincoln Memorial ceremony in the March on Washington in 1963. But her importance as a historical figure has been overlooked by scholars of the civil rights movement. Daisy Bates: Civil Rights Crusader from Arkansas chroni
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F419.L7 S76 2005 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=534343 Available EBL534343

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. A Little Girl from Huttig; 2. A Much Older Man; 3. A Newspaper All Their Own; 4. Two for the Price of One; 5. An Unwavering Commitment; 6. The Bombshell of Brown v. Board of Education; 7. A Foot in the Schoolhouse Door; 8. Two Steps Back; 9. Front and Center; 10. Who Is That Woman in Little Rock?; 11. A Battle Every Day; 12. Woman of the Year; 13. Holding the Line; 14. Coping with Defeat; 15. The New York Years; 16. Going in Different Directions; 17. The Long Shadow of Little Rock; 18. Mitchellville-Self-Help or Monument?; 19. Fighting Over a Legend

NotesIndex

Daisy Bates (1914-1999) is renowned as the mentor of the Little Rock Nine, the first African Americans to attend Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. For guiding the Nine through one of the most tumultuous civil rights crises of the 1950s, she was selected as Woman of the Year in Education by the Associated Press in 1957 and was the only woman invited to speak at the Lincoln Memorial ceremony in the March on Washington in 1963. But her importance as a historical figure has been overlooked by scholars of the civil rights movement. Daisy Bates: Civil Rights Crusader from Arkansas chroni

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Arkansas ACLU attorney Stockley focuses on the force of Daisy Bates's personality as the key to her success as a civil rights advocate--first as Arkansas's NAACP president in the mid-1950s, then as spokesperson and strategist for the integration struggle at Little Rock's Central High School in 1957, and finally as a dynamic speaker at NAACP events throughout the nation. Stockley suggests that the accolades and attention were largely the results of Bates's own self-promotion, as well as the work of her quieter but no less influential husband, L. C. Bates, who often spotlighted his charismatic wife in his newspaper, the State Press. Beyond the gossipy details about Daisy Bates's early life and remembrances by friends and foes in her later years, the book amplifies well the tremendous financial, social, and emotional costs of civil rights activism. Bates employed various coping strategies, from pills and alcohol to long stints at a New York hotel. The author's inconsistent combination of faithful reliance and critical dismissal of Bates's ghostwritten autobiography, The Long Shadow of Little Rock (1962), is troubling. Finally, the book's constructed narrative elements require careful handling; illustrations seem superfluous, raising as many questions as they answer, and several photographs are undated and the individuals unidentified. ^BSumming Up: Optional. General and undergraduate collections. M. A. McEuen Transylvania University

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