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For Their Own Good : Civilian Evacuations in Germany and France, 1939-1945

By: Torrie, Julia S.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Berghahn Books, 2010Description: 1 online resource (279 p.).ISBN: 9781845458164.Subject(s): Bombing, Aerial -- Social aspects -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations | World War, 1939-1945 -- Evacuation of civilians -- France | World War, 1939-1945 -- Evacuation of civilians -- GermanyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: For Their Own Good : Civilian Evacuations in Germany and France, 1939-1945DDC classification: 940.53/16 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""For Their Own Good""; Table of Contents; List of Illustrations; Abbreviations; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1: Preparing for Air War; Chapter 2: Order or Chaos?; Chapter 3: Organizing Evacuations; Chapter 4: Our Stay Gives Us No Pleasure; Chapter 5: If Only Family Unity Can Be Maintained; Chapter 6: On the Basis of Selection; Chapter 7: Responding to Chaos; Chapter 8: Evacuation's Aftermath; Notes; Note on Sources; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The early twentieth-century advent of aerial bombing made successful evacuations essential to any war effort, but ordinary people resented them deeply. Based on extensive archival research in Germany and France, this is the first broad, comparative study of civilian evacuations in Germany and France during World War II. The evidence uncovered exposes the complexities of an assumed monolithic and all-powerful Nazi state by showing that citizens' objections to evacuations, which were rooted in family concerns, forced changes in policy. Drawing attention to the interaction between the Germans and
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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D809 .G3 T67 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=544429 Available EBL544429
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D807.U6 T66 2003 G.I. Nightingales : D808 .O98 2012 Outcast Europe : D809.E8 L44 1999eb The Legacy of Nazi Occupation : D809 .G3 T67 2010 For Their Own Good : D809.G7 W45 2010 Churchill's Children : D810 Britain's Best Kept Secret : D810.C4 W27 2002 The War of Our Childhood :

""For Their Own Good""; Table of Contents; List of Illustrations; Abbreviations; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1: Preparing for Air War; Chapter 2: Order or Chaos?; Chapter 3: Organizing Evacuations; Chapter 4: Our Stay Gives Us No Pleasure; Chapter 5: If Only Family Unity Can Be Maintained; Chapter 6: On the Basis of Selection; Chapter 7: Responding to Chaos; Chapter 8: Evacuation's Aftermath; Notes; Note on Sources; Bibliography; Index

The early twentieth-century advent of aerial bombing made successful evacuations essential to any war effort, but ordinary people resented them deeply. Based on extensive archival research in Germany and France, this is the first broad, comparative study of civilian evacuations in Germany and France during World War II. The evidence uncovered exposes the complexities of an assumed monolithic and all-powerful Nazi state by showing that citizens' objections to evacuations, which were rooted in family concerns, forced changes in policy. Drawing attention to the interaction between the Germans and

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The strength of Torrie's monograph is certainly its comparative analysis of German and French evacuations and the relationship between them. Discussions of interwar civilian defense strategies and the postwar fates of evacuees bracket the analysis of policies as they developed during the war. Torrie (St. Thomas Univ., Canada) demonstrates that German and French approaches varied according to experiences in WW I and self-understandings of national character: Germany planned to keep civilians in the cities to defend their homes and national community, whereas France planned to evacuate civilians from their homes and thus emphasized individual decision. Analyzing preemptive, reactive, and emergency situations, Torrie argues that German evacuations were less family-friendly, longer distance, and more regulated, while the French stressed family decisions and kept evacuees closer to home. Both sides compromised and improvised, partly in response to each other's experience and especially in the chaos at war's end. Thematic chapters address the exclusion of outsiders (Jews, the mentally ill, asocials), evacuees' experiences, and the significance of the family unit. In the latter, Torrie points to limits of authoritarian state power to intervene in private lives. A highly readable and convincing study. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. F. Schroeder St. John's University/College of St. Benedict, Minnesota

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Julia S. Torrie completed her PhD at Harvard University and has taught European History at St. Thomas University in Canada since 2002.</p>

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