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The Power of Tiananmen : State-Society Relations and the 1989 Beijing Student Movement

By: Zhao, Dingxin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (465 p.).ISBN: 9780226982625.Subject(s): China - History - Tiananmen Square Incident, 1989 | China -- History -- Tiananmen Square Incident, 1989 | China -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Power of Tiananmen : State-Society Relations and the 1989 Beijing Student MovementDDC classification: 951.05/8 | 951.058 LOC classification: DS779.32 | Z436 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreward by Charles Tilly; Preface; Chronology; Introduction; Part One: The Origin of the 1989 Student Movement; 1 China's State-Society Relations and Their Changes during the 1980s; 2 Intellectual Elites and the 1989 Movement; 3 Economic Reform, University Expansion, and Student Discontents; 4 The Decline of the System for Controlling Students in Universities; 5 On the Eve of the 1989 Movement; Part Two: The Development of the 1989 Beijing Student Movement; 6 A Brief History of the 1989 Movement; 7 State Legitimacy, State Behaviors, and Movement Development
8 Ecology-Based Mobilization and Movement Dynamics9 State-Society Relations and the Discourses and Activities of a Movement; 10 The State, Movement Communication, and the Construction of Public Opinion; Conclusion; Appendix 1: A Methodological Note; Appendix 2: Interview Questions; References; Name Index; Subject Index
Summary: In the spring of 1989 over 100,000 students in Beijing initiated the largest student revolt in human history. Television screens across the world filled with searing images from Tiananmen Square of protesters thronging the streets, massive hunger strikes, tanks set ablaze, and survivors tending to the dead and wounded after a swift and brutal government crackdown.Dingxin Zhao's award-winning The Power of Tiananmen is the definitive treatment of these historic events. Along with grassroots tales and interviews with the young men and women who launched the demonstrations, Zha
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS779.32 Z436 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=557594 Available EBL557594

Contents; Foreward by Charles Tilly; Preface; Chronology; Introduction; Part One: The Origin of the 1989 Student Movement; 1 China's State-Society Relations and Their Changes during the 1980s; 2 Intellectual Elites and the 1989 Movement; 3 Economic Reform, University Expansion, and Student Discontents; 4 The Decline of the System for Controlling Students in Universities; 5 On the Eve of the 1989 Movement; Part Two: The Development of the 1989 Beijing Student Movement; 6 A Brief History of the 1989 Movement; 7 State Legitimacy, State Behaviors, and Movement Development

8 Ecology-Based Mobilization and Movement Dynamics9 State-Society Relations and the Discourses and Activities of a Movement; 10 The State, Movement Communication, and the Construction of Public Opinion; Conclusion; Appendix 1: A Methodological Note; Appendix 2: Interview Questions; References; Name Index; Subject Index

In the spring of 1989 over 100,000 students in Beijing initiated the largest student revolt in human history. Television screens across the world filled with searing images from Tiananmen Square of protesters thronging the streets, massive hunger strikes, tanks set ablaze, and survivors tending to the dead and wounded after a swift and brutal government crackdown.Dingxin Zhao's award-winning The Power of Tiananmen is the definitive treatment of these historic events. Along with grassroots tales and interviews with the young men and women who launched the demonstrations, Zha

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dingxin Zhao is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Chicago.

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