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Right to Ride : Streetcar Boycotts and African American Citizenship in the Era of Plessy v. Ferguson

By: Kelley, Blair L. M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (278 p.).ISBN: 9780807895818.Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights -- History | Boycotts -- United States -- History | Civil rights movements -- United States -- History | New Orleans (La.) -- Race relations -- History | Richmond (Va.) -- Race relations -- History | Savannah (Ga.) -- Race relations -- History | Segregation in transportation -- United States -- History | United States -- Race relations -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Right to Ride : Streetcar Boycotts and African American Citizenship in the Era of Plessy v. FergusonDDC classification: 323.1196/073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 NEW YORK: The Antebellum Roots of Segregation and Dissent; 2 THE COLOR LINE AND THE LADIES' CAR: Segregation on Southern Rails before Plessy; 3 OUR PEOPLE, OUR PROBLEM?: Plessy and the Divided New Orleans; 4 WHERE ARE OUR FRIENDS?: Crumbling Alliances and New Orleans Streetcar Boycott; Illustrations appears; 5 WHO'S TO BLAME?: Maggie Lena Walker, John Mitchell Jr., and the Great Class Debate; 6 NEGROES EVERYWHERE ARE WALKING: Work, Women, and the Richmond Streetcar Boycott; 7 BATTLING JIM CROW'S BUZZARDS: Betrayal and the Savannah Streetcar Boycott
8 BEND WITH UNABATED PROTEST: On the Meaning of FailureNotes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Through a reexamination of the earliest struggles against Jim Crow, Blair Kelley exposes the fullness of African American efforts to resist the passage of segregation laws dividing trains and streetcars by race in the early Jim Crow era. Right to Ride chronicles the litigation and local organizing against segregated rails that led to the Plessy v. Ferguson decision in 1896 and the streetcar boycott movement waged in twenty-five southern cities from 1900 to 1907. Kelley tells the stories of the brave but little-known men and women who faced down the violence of lynching and urban
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.61 .K355 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=565696 Available EBL565696

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 NEW YORK: The Antebellum Roots of Segregation and Dissent; 2 THE COLOR LINE AND THE LADIES' CAR: Segregation on Southern Rails before Plessy; 3 OUR PEOPLE, OUR PROBLEM?: Plessy and the Divided New Orleans; 4 WHERE ARE OUR FRIENDS?: Crumbling Alliances and New Orleans Streetcar Boycott; Illustrations appears; 5 WHO'S TO BLAME?: Maggie Lena Walker, John Mitchell Jr., and the Great Class Debate; 6 NEGROES EVERYWHERE ARE WALKING: Work, Women, and the Richmond Streetcar Boycott; 7 BATTLING JIM CROW'S BUZZARDS: Betrayal and the Savannah Streetcar Boycott

8 BEND WITH UNABATED PROTEST: On the Meaning of FailureNotes; Bibliography; Index

Through a reexamination of the earliest struggles against Jim Crow, Blair Kelley exposes the fullness of African American efforts to resist the passage of segregation laws dividing trains and streetcars by race in the early Jim Crow era. Right to Ride chronicles the litigation and local organizing against segregated rails that led to the Plessy v. Ferguson decision in 1896 and the streetcar boycott movement waged in twenty-five southern cities from 1900 to 1907. Kelley tells the stories of the brave but little-known men and women who faced down the violence of lynching and urban

Description based upon print version of record.

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