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Black Rage in New Orleans : Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane Katrina

By: Moore, Leonard N.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (327 p.).ISBN: 9780807137406.Subject(s): African Americans - Louisiana - New Orleans - Social conditions - 20th century | African Americans -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- Social conditions -- 20th century | New Orleans (La.) - Race relations - History - 20th century | New Orleans (La.) -- Race relations -- History -- 20th century | Police-community relations - Louisiana - New Orleans - History - 20th century | Police-community relations -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Black Rage in New Orleans : Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane KatrinaDDC classification: 363.232 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Tables; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; INTRODUCTION: Police Violence, New Orleans, and the Postwar Urban Landscape; 1 NEGRO POLICE WILL AID IN LAW AND ORDER: The Fight for Black Police in the Crescent City; 2 OR DOES IT EXPLODE?: The Black Freedom Struggle Comes to New Orleans; 3 ""WE WANT AN END TO POLICE BRUTALITY"": The Black Panthers, Desire, and Police Repression; 4 THE POLITICS OF SELF-DEFENSE: Mark Essex, the Soul Patrol, and Black Vigilantism; Illustrations; 5 THE RIGHT TO ORGANIZE: The Black Organization of Police, Mass Protest, and the City Council Hearings
6 BLACK POWER POLITICS: Ernest "Dutch" Morial and the Limits of Police Reform7 "WE ARE LIVING IN A POLICE STATE": The Algiers Tragedy, the Maturation of Community Protest, and the Politics of a Civilian Review Board; 8 BLACK-ON-BLACK CRIME: The Consequences of White Flight, the War on Drugs, and Political Indifference; 9 "A NEW DAY IN BABYLON": The Professionalization of the New Orleans Police Department and the Claiming of Urban Public Space; EPILOGUE: Policing Katrina; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In Black Rage in New Orleans, Moore traces the shocking history of police corruption in the Crescent City from World War II to Hurricane Katrina and the concurrent rise of a large and energized black opposition to it. Moore explores a staggering array of NOPD abuses - police homicides, sexual violence against women, racial profiling, and complicity in drug deals, prostitution rings, burglaries, protection schemes, and gun smuggling - and the increasingly voceriferous calls for reform by the city's black community. The first book-length study of police brutality and African American protest in
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F379.N557 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=570405 Available EBL570405

Contents; List of Tables; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; INTRODUCTION: Police Violence, New Orleans, and the Postwar Urban Landscape; 1 NEGRO POLICE WILL AID IN LAW AND ORDER: The Fight for Black Police in the Crescent City; 2 OR DOES IT EXPLODE?: The Black Freedom Struggle Comes to New Orleans; 3 ""WE WANT AN END TO POLICE BRUTALITY"": The Black Panthers, Desire, and Police Repression; 4 THE POLITICS OF SELF-DEFENSE: Mark Essex, the Soul Patrol, and Black Vigilantism; Illustrations; 5 THE RIGHT TO ORGANIZE: The Black Organization of Police, Mass Protest, and the City Council Hearings

6 BLACK POWER POLITICS: Ernest "Dutch" Morial and the Limits of Police Reform7 "WE ARE LIVING IN A POLICE STATE": The Algiers Tragedy, the Maturation of Community Protest, and the Politics of a Civilian Review Board; 8 BLACK-ON-BLACK CRIME: The Consequences of White Flight, the War on Drugs, and Political Indifference; 9 "A NEW DAY IN BABYLON": The Professionalization of the New Orleans Police Department and the Claiming of Urban Public Space; EPILOGUE: Policing Katrina; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In Black Rage in New Orleans, Moore traces the shocking history of police corruption in the Crescent City from World War II to Hurricane Katrina and the concurrent rise of a large and energized black opposition to it. Moore explores a staggering array of NOPD abuses - police homicides, sexual violence against women, racial profiling, and complicity in drug deals, prostitution rings, burglaries, protection schemes, and gun smuggling - and the increasingly voceriferous calls for reform by the city's black community. The first book-length study of police brutality and African American protest in

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Moore (black history, Texas) draws on and creates a confluence of multiple academic disciplines, most prominently, sociology, history, criminal justice, political science, social psychology, and public policy analysis. He clearly identifies and pursues elements of long-standing racism in New Orleans and the legacy of mistreatment of the African American population. For all the quality and focus of this material, one important issue is conspicuously absent, thought Moore seems to lead readers up to its very acknowledgement: the role and impact of African American culture upon quality of life conditions as they influence critical relationships. The ripple effect and long-term economic fallout caused by "white flight" must be absolutely recognized. How has the mass exodus of the white middle/lower classes from New Orleans affected key social components such as education, personal and private economics, and employment opportunities? Perhaps the most glaring issue is the quality of law enforcement services. Knowing and recognizing the historical, economic, and political events leading and contributing to the Hurricane Katrina debacle is essential for understanding how police service became ineffective and generally disintegrated. This work is laudably researched and conducted on the appropriate scholarly level, maintaining well-established academic standards. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. M. Seklecki Minot State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Leonard N. Moore is professor of black history at the University of Texas at Austin and author of Carl B. Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power.</p>

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