Defying Disfranchisement : Black Voting Rights Activism in the Jim Crow South, 1890-1908

By: Riser, R. VolneyMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (337 p.)ISBN: 9780807137413Subject(s): African American political activists | African Americans - Civil rights - Southern States - History - 19th century | African Americans - Civil rights - Southern States - History - 20th century | African Americans - Suffrage - Southern States | Southern States - Politics and government - 1865-1950 | Voter registration - Southern StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Defying Disfranchisement : Black Voting Rights Activism in the Jim Crow South, 1890-1908DDC classification: 324.6/208996073075 | 324.62089960 LOC classification: JK1929.A2R57 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Prologue: April 27, 1903; 1. We Must Either Fight or Submit: Phase One Begins; 2. If Thine Eye Be Evil: The Road to Williams v. Mississippi; 3. The Grandfather Clause: Phase Two Begins; 4. Negroes Have Organized: Alabama's Disfranchisers, Black Activists, and the Courts; 5. An Appeal to the Colored Citizens of Alabama: Registration and Resistance; 6. The Enemies' Works: The Alabama Cases Begin; 7. Swords and Torches: The Virginians Enter the Fray; 8. The Second Dred Scott Case: Giles v. Harris Is Decided; 9. The Banner Negroes: Fighting to the End; Acknowledgments; A Note on Sources
NotesIndex
Summary: In Defying Disfranchisement, R. Volney Riser documents a number of lawsuits challenging various requirements---including literacy tests, poll taxes, and white primaries---designed primarily to strip African American men of their right to vote in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Twelve of these wended their way to the U. S. Supreme Court, and that body coldly ignored the systematic disfranchisement of black southerners. Nevertheless, as Riser demonstrates, the attempts themselves were stunning and demonstrate that even at one of their darkest hours, African Americans sheltered
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JK1929.A2R57 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=570408 Available EBL570408

Contents; Prologue: April 27, 1903; 1. We Must Either Fight or Submit: Phase One Begins; 2. If Thine Eye Be Evil: The Road to Williams v. Mississippi; 3. The Grandfather Clause: Phase Two Begins; 4. Negroes Have Organized: Alabama's Disfranchisers, Black Activists, and the Courts; 5. An Appeal to the Colored Citizens of Alabama: Registration and Resistance; 6. The Enemies' Works: The Alabama Cases Begin; 7. Swords and Torches: The Virginians Enter the Fray; 8. The Second Dred Scott Case: Giles v. Harris Is Decided; 9. The Banner Negroes: Fighting to the End; Acknowledgments; A Note on Sources

NotesIndex

In Defying Disfranchisement, R. Volney Riser documents a number of lawsuits challenging various requirements---including literacy tests, poll taxes, and white primaries---designed primarily to strip African American men of their right to vote in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Twelve of these wended their way to the U. S. Supreme Court, and that body coldly ignored the systematic disfranchisement of black southerners. Nevertheless, as Riser demonstrates, the attempts themselves were stunning and demonstrate that even at one of their darkest hours, African Americans sheltered

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

R. Volney Riser is cochair of the Department of History and Social Science at the University of West Alabama in Livingston.

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