Normal view MARC view ISBD view

A Slaveholders' Union : Slavery, Politics, and the Constitution in the Early American Republic

By: Van Cleve, George William.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (403 p.).ISBN: 9780226846699.Subject(s): Slavery - History - 18th century | Slavery -- History -- 18th century | Slavery - History - 19th century | Slavery -- History -- 19th century | Slavery - Law and legislation - United States - History - 18th century | Slavery - Law and legislation - United States - History - 19th century | Slavery - Political aspects - United States | Slavery -- Political aspects -- United States | United States - History - 1783-1815 | United States - History - Revolution, 1775-1783Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Slaveholders' Union : Slavery, Politics, and the Constitution in the Early American RepublicDDC classification: 306.3620973 | 973.7/1 | 973.71 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; Introduction; Part One: Slavery in the American Revolution; 1. From Empire to Confederation; 2. Abolition, Slavery Reform, and the Climate of Opinion; Part Two: The Making of the Slaveholders' Constitution; 3. Property and Republican Representation; 4. Sectional Bargaining and Moral Union; Part Three: Slavery in the New Nation; 5. From Constitution to Republican Empire; 6. The Missouri Compact and the Rule of Law; Conclusion: Slavery and the Dismal Fate of Madisonian Politics; Acknowledgments; Appendix A: Notes on the Law of Slavery and Bound Labor
Appendix B: Calculating Nonslaveholder Voting StrengthAppendix C: Calculations in Support of Table 4.1; Appendix D: House of Representatives Action on the Quaker Memorials; Abbreviations; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: After its early introduction into the English colonies in North America, slavery in the United States lasted as a legal institution until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution in 1865.  But increasingly during the contested politics of the early republic, abolitionists cried out that the Constitution itself was a slaveowners' document, produced to protect and further their rights. A Slaveholders' Union furthers this unsettling claim by demonstrating once and for all that slavery was indeed an essential part of the foundation of the nascent republic.In thi
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E446 .V363 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=602626 Available EBL602626

Contents; List of Illustrations; Introduction; Part One: Slavery in the American Revolution; 1. From Empire to Confederation; 2. Abolition, Slavery Reform, and the Climate of Opinion; Part Two: The Making of the Slaveholders' Constitution; 3. Property and Republican Representation; 4. Sectional Bargaining and Moral Union; Part Three: Slavery in the New Nation; 5. From Constitution to Republican Empire; 6. The Missouri Compact and the Rule of Law; Conclusion: Slavery and the Dismal Fate of Madisonian Politics; Acknowledgments; Appendix A: Notes on the Law of Slavery and Bound Labor

Appendix B: Calculating Nonslaveholder Voting StrengthAppendix C: Calculations in Support of Table 4.1; Appendix D: House of Representatives Action on the Quaker Memorials; Abbreviations; Notes; Bibliography; Index

After its early introduction into the English colonies in North America, slavery in the United States lasted as a legal institution until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution in 1865.  But increasingly during the contested politics of the early republic, abolitionists cried out that the Constitution itself was a slaveowners' document, produced to protect and further their rights. A Slaveholders' Union furthers this unsettling claim by demonstrating once and for all that slavery was indeed an essential part of the foundation of the nascent republic.In thi

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

George William Van Cleve is Scholar-in-Residence in the Department of History at the University of Virginia.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.