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Way Up North in Louisville : African American Migration in the Urban South, 1930-1970

By: Adams, Luther.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (289 p.).ISBN: 9780807899434.Subject(s): African Americans -- Kentucky -- Louisville -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Kentucky -- Louisville -- Social conditions -- 20th century | African Americans -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century | African Americans --Kentucky -- Louisville -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- Kentucky -- Louisville -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Migration, Internal -- Southern States -- History -- 20th century | Rural-urban migration -- Southern States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Way Up North in Louisville : African American Migration in the Urban South, 1930-1970DDC classification: 307.2089/96073076944 LOC classification: F459.L89 N427 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION; 1 HEADED FOR LOUISVILLE: African American Migration within the South; 2 WAY UP NORTH IN LOUISVILLE: Migration and the Meaning of the South; 3 I NEVER JIM CROWED MYSELF: Navigating the Boundaries of Race in the River City; 4 NO ROOM FOR POSSUM OR CRAWFISH: African American Migrants' Challenge to Jim Crow; 5 BEHOLD THE LAND: To Stay and Fight at Home and Struggle for Civil Rights; 6 UPON THIS ROCK: African American Migration and the Transformation of the Postwar Urban Landscape; CONCLUSION: A Tale of Two Cities
APPENDIX: Migration, Population, and Employment DataNotes; Bibliography; Permissions for the Reprinting of Song Lyrics; Index
Summary: Luther Adams demonstrates that in the wake of World War II, when roughly half the black population left the South seeking greater opportunity and freedom in the North and West, the same desire often anchored African Americans to the South. Way Up North in Louisville explores the forces that led blacks to move to urban centers in the South to make their homes. Adams defines ""home"" as a commitment to life in the South that fueled the emergence of a more cohesive sense of urban community and enabled southern blacks to maintain their ties to the South as a place of personal identity, fam
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F459.L89 N427 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=605903 Available EBL605903
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
F456.F68 1 Blue-grass and Rhododendron : F457.H3 P67 2010 They Say in Harlan County : F459.L853 Cecelia and Fanny : F459.L89 N427 2010 Way Up North in Louisville : F474.S29 N44 2006eb Black Liberation in the Midwest : F534.I39 N43 2005eb Polite Protest : F548.68.B76B69 2008 Jim Crow Nostalgia :

Contents; Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION; 1 HEADED FOR LOUISVILLE: African American Migration within the South; 2 WAY UP NORTH IN LOUISVILLE: Migration and the Meaning of the South; 3 I NEVER JIM CROWED MYSELF: Navigating the Boundaries of Race in the River City; 4 NO ROOM FOR POSSUM OR CRAWFISH: African American Migrants' Challenge to Jim Crow; 5 BEHOLD THE LAND: To Stay and Fight at Home and Struggle for Civil Rights; 6 UPON THIS ROCK: African American Migration and the Transformation of the Postwar Urban Landscape; CONCLUSION: A Tale of Two Cities

APPENDIX: Migration, Population, and Employment DataNotes; Bibliography; Permissions for the Reprinting of Song Lyrics; Index

Luther Adams demonstrates that in the wake of World War II, when roughly half the black population left the South seeking greater opportunity and freedom in the North and West, the same desire often anchored African Americans to the South. Way Up North in Louisville explores the forces that led blacks to move to urban centers in the South to make their homes. Adams defines ""home"" as a commitment to life in the South that fueled the emergence of a more cohesive sense of urban community and enabled southern blacks to maintain their ties to the South as a place of personal identity, fam

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

As a counter to the many recent studies of the African American populations that left the South for the North in the mid-20th century, Adams studies the lives and transformations among those who remained in the urban South. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Recent histories devoted to 20th-century African American migration have focused primarily on the two great migrations during which some 5 million people left the South. By contrast, this unique study "departs from the previous scholarship by examining how African American migrants who stayed in the South transformed the culture and politics of the South from within the South." Adams (Univ. of Washington, Tacoma) also uses "home" as a conceptual framework to explain the site in which African Americans constructed a community and culture partially autonomous of their enduring resistance to white supremacy. Throughout, Adams details the struggle of Louisville's black residents, many thousands of whom arrived in the city during the economic and political upheavals that drove the great migrations north and west. They built networks to aid one another in finding housing, jobs, and access to the city's African American cultural and social life, and in so doing impacted the course of the civil rights movement and postwar urban development. Adams extensively uses archived oral histories as well as several exclusive interviews. The records of local government institutions, churches, libraries, and newspapers enrich the narrative. A well-told story and a fine example of historiographic method. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. R. Wendland Grand Valley State University

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