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Stormy Weather : Middle-class African American Marriages Between the Two World Wars

By: Curwood, Anastasia.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (213 p.).ISBN: 9780807868386.Subject(s): African American families | African Americans -- Marriage | United States -- History -- 1919-1933Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Stormy Weather : Middle-class African American Marriages Between the Two World WarsDDC classification: 305.896/073 | 305.896073 LOC classification: E185.86 .C987 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 FROM UPLIFT TO NEW NEGRO MARRIAGES: Changing Ideals of Sexuality and Activism in African American Marriages, 1890-1940; 2 NEW NEGRO HUSBANDS; 3 NEW NEGRO WIVES; 4 THE EVERYDAY CHALLENGES OF UPWARD MOBILITY: Class Identity and Married Couples; 5 LOVE AND TROUBLE IN INTERWAR MARRIAGES; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; L; M; N; R; S; T; W
Summary: The so-called New Negroes of the period between World Wars I and II embodied a new sense of racial pride and upward mobility for the race. Many of them thought that relationships between spouses could be a crucial factor in realizing this dream. But there was little agreement about how spousal relationships should actually function in an ideal New Negro marriage. Shedding light on an often-overlooked aspect of African American social history, Anastasia Curwood explores the public and private negotiations over gender relationships inside marriage that consumed upwardly mobile black Americans be
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E185.86 .C987 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=605908 Available EBL605908

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 FROM UPLIFT TO NEW NEGRO MARRIAGES: Changing Ideals of Sexuality and Activism in African American Marriages, 1890-1940; 2 NEW NEGRO HUSBANDS; 3 NEW NEGRO WIVES; 4 THE EVERYDAY CHALLENGES OF UPWARD MOBILITY: Class Identity and Married Couples; 5 LOVE AND TROUBLE IN INTERWAR MARRIAGES; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; L; M; N; R; S; T; W

The so-called New Negroes of the period between World Wars I and II embodied a new sense of racial pride and upward mobility for the race. Many of them thought that relationships between spouses could be a crucial factor in realizing this dream. But there was little agreement about how spousal relationships should actually function in an ideal New Negro marriage. Shedding light on an often-overlooked aspect of African American social history, Anastasia Curwood explores the public and private negotiations over gender relationships inside marriage that consumed upwardly mobile black Americans be

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Curwood (Vanderbilt Univ.) has initiated a virtually unprecedented conversation on the history of marriage among African Americans and opened up what Davarian Baldwin (Trinity College) calls a "whole new field of inquiry." The author examines African American marriages between the world wars. She explores the impact of class, work, and skin color on marital relationships, and uses the lens of "love and trouble" (borrowed from Gayl Jones and Patricia Hill Collins) to look at the "simultaneity of good and bad" as middle-class black women experienced love, sadness, and anger as they sought to fulfill conflicting expectations. Curwood describes how women negotiated conflict between work outside the home (or their desire for a career) and the desire of patriarchal husbands to be the sole breadwinner. She discusses the interior lives of black people, which heretofore have been so hidden from public view as to encourage the mistaken belief that black people have no interior lives. Intriguingly, the author discusses the marriages and "gender politics" of Marcus and Amy Jacques Garvey, Charles S. Johnson, A. Philip Randolph, E. Franklin Frazier, Jean Toomer, Robert and Katherine Flippin, and the author's own grandparents. A must read. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. W. Glasker Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden

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