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The Presidency in the Era of 24-Hour News.

By: Cohen, Jeffrey E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (273 p.).ISBN: 9781400837793.Subject(s): Presidents - United States | Press and politics - United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Presidency in the Era of 24-Hour NewsDDC classification: 320.973 | 352.230973 LOC classification: JK516Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Tables; Preface; Acknowledgments; CHAPTER 1 The Growing Disconnect between Presidential News Coverage and Public Opinion; CHAPTER 2 The Presidential News System during the Golden Age of Presidential Television; CHAPTER 3 The New Media Age and the Decline in Presidential News; CHAPTER 4 Change in Presidential News over the Long Haul: The New York Times Historical Series, 1857-1998; CHAPTER 5 The Increasing Negativity in Presidential News in the Age of New Media; CHAPTER 6 Sources of Negativity in Presidential News during the Age of New Media
CHAPTER 7 The Declining Audience for News and the New Media AgeCHAPTER 8 Declining Trust in the News Media and the New Media Age; CHAPTER 9 The Implications of the New Media on the Presidential News System and Presidential Leadership; CHAPTER 10 Conclusions: The New Media, the Presidency, and American Politics; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The Presidency in the Era of 24-Hour News examines how changes in the news media since the golden age of television--when three major networks held a near monopoly on the news people saw in the United States--have altered the way presidents communicate with the public and garner popular support. How did Bill Clinton manage to maintain high approval ratings during the Monica Lewinsky scandal? Why has the Iraq war mired George Bush in the lowest approval ratings of his presidency? Jeffrey Cohen reveals how the decline of government regulation and the growth of Internet and cable news o
List(s) this item appears in: Political Games Exhibit
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JK516 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=664556 Available EBL664556

Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Tables; Preface; Acknowledgments; CHAPTER 1 The Growing Disconnect between Presidential News Coverage and Public Opinion; CHAPTER 2 The Presidential News System during the Golden Age of Presidential Television; CHAPTER 3 The New Media Age and the Decline in Presidential News; CHAPTER 4 Change in Presidential News over the Long Haul: The New York Times Historical Series, 1857-1998; CHAPTER 5 The Increasing Negativity in Presidential News in the Age of New Media; CHAPTER 6 Sources of Negativity in Presidential News during the Age of New Media

CHAPTER 7 The Declining Audience for News and the New Media AgeCHAPTER 8 Declining Trust in the News Media and the New Media Age; CHAPTER 9 The Implications of the New Media on the Presidential News System and Presidential Leadership; CHAPTER 10 Conclusions: The New Media, the Presidency, and American Politics; Notes; Bibliography; Index

The Presidency in the Era of 24-Hour News examines how changes in the news media since the golden age of television--when three major networks held a near monopoly on the news people saw in the United States--have altered the way presidents communicate with the public and garner popular support. How did Bill Clinton manage to maintain high approval ratings during the Monica Lewinsky scandal? Why has the Iraq war mired George Bush in the lowest approval ratings of his presidency? Jeffrey Cohen reveals how the decline of government regulation and the growth of Internet and cable news o

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Cohen (Fordham Univ.) begins this study with the observation that the news media "are no longer as consequential in helping frame public opinion toward the president as they were a generation ago." This study is all about how that came to be, what this growing disconnect means for public opinion and presidential responsiveness, and what changed to bring the US to the point to where the tone of presidential news no longer seems to have much of an effect on public evaluations of a president. Cohen has constructed a revised and refined version of the "presidential news system" (the president, the news media, and the mass public) paradigm. He argues that as the "golden age of television" evolved into the age of the new media in the late l970s and early 1980s, a growing disconnect between the news and presidential support (approval) became apparent. Thoroughly grounded in political communication theory, this book is an excellent read on changes in presidential governance. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers, upper-division undergraduate students, graduate students, and research faculty. W. K. Hall Bradley University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jeffrey E. Cohen is professor of political science at Fordham University. He is the author of Presidential Responsiveness and Public Policy-Making .

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