One day that shook the Communist world : the 1956 Hungarian uprising and its legacy / Paul Lendvai ; translated by Ann Major.

By: Lendvai, Paul, 1929- [author.]Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Original language: German Series: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (297 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations, mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400837649; 1400837642Other title: 1956 Hungarian uprising and its legacyUniform titles: Ungarnaufstand 1956. English Subject(s): Revolution (Hungary : 1956) | 1956 | HISTORY | HISTORY -- Modern -- 20th Century | Hungary -- History -- Revolution, 1956 | HungaryGenre/Form: Electronic books. | History. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: One day that shook the Communist world.DDC classification: 943.905/2 LOC classification: DB957 | .L41213 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
1. A day that shook the Communist world -- 2. The road to revolution -- 3. A night of cataclysmic decisions -- 4. The legend of the corvinists -- 5. Wrestling for the soul of Imre Nagy -- 6. Deadlocked -- 7. A turnaround with a question mark -- 8. The general, the colonel, and the adjutant -- 9. The dams are breaking -- 10. The condottiere, the "Uncle," and the romantics --11. Decision in the Kremlin: the end of patience -- 12. Double dive into darkness -- 13. The puppeteers and the Kádár Enigma -- 14. Operation whirlwind and Kádár phantom government -- 15. The Yugoslav-Soviet conspiracy -- 16. The second revolution --17. The moral bankruptcy of the U.S. liberation theory -- 18. Worldwide reactions -- 19. The barbarous vendetta of the victors -- 20. 1956-1989: victory in defeat? -- Epilogue: Whose 1956? -- Acknowledgements -- Chronology -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: On October 23, 1956, a popular uprising against Soviet rule swept through Hungary like a force of nature, only to be mercilessly crushed by Soviet tanks twelve days later. Only now, fifty years after those harrowing events, can the full story be told. This book is a powerful eyewitness account and a gripping history of the uprising in Hungary that heralded the future liberation of Eastern Europe. Paul Lendvai was a young journalist covering politics in Hungary when the uprising broke out. He knew the government officials and revolutionaries involved. He was on the front lines of the student protests and the bloody street fights and he saw the revolutionary government smashed by the Red Army. In this riveting, deeply personal, and often irreverent book, Lendvai weaves his own experiences with in-depth reportage to unravel the complex chain of events leading up to and including the uprising, its brutal suppression, and its far-reaching political repercussions in Hungary and neighboring Eastern Bloc countries. He draws upon exclusive interviews with Russian and former KGB officials, survivors of the Soviet backlash, and relatives of those executed. He reveals new evidence from closed tribunals and documents kept secret in Soviet and Hungarian archives. Lendvai's breathtaking narrative shows how the uprising, while tragic, delivered a stunning blow to Communism that helped to ultimately bring about its demise. One Day That Shook the Communist World is the best account of these unprecedented events.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-284) and index.

1. A day that shook the Communist world -- 2. The road to revolution -- 3. A night of cataclysmic decisions -- 4. The legend of the corvinists -- 5. Wrestling for the soul of Imre Nagy -- 6. Deadlocked -- 7. A turnaround with a question mark -- 8. The general, the colonel, and the adjutant -- 9. The dams are breaking -- 10. The condottiere, the "Uncle," and the romantics --11. Decision in the Kremlin: the end of patience -- 12. Double dive into darkness -- 13. The puppeteers and the Kádár Enigma -- 14. Operation whirlwind and Kádár phantom government -- 15. The Yugoslav-Soviet conspiracy -- 16. The second revolution --17. The moral bankruptcy of the U.S. liberation theory -- 18. Worldwide reactions -- 19. The barbarous vendetta of the victors -- 20. 1956-1989: victory in defeat? -- Epilogue: Whose 1956? -- Acknowledgements -- Chronology -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

On October 23, 1956, a popular uprising against Soviet rule swept through Hungary like a force of nature, only to be mercilessly crushed by Soviet tanks twelve days later. Only now, fifty years after those harrowing events, can the full story be told. This book is a powerful eyewitness account and a gripping history of the uprising in Hungary that heralded the future liberation of Eastern Europe. Paul Lendvai was a young journalist covering politics in Hungary when the uprising broke out. He knew the government officials and revolutionaries involved. He was on the front lines of the student protests and the bloody street fights and he saw the revolutionary government smashed by the Red Army. In this riveting, deeply personal, and often irreverent book, Lendvai weaves his own experiences with in-depth reportage to unravel the complex chain of events leading up to and including the uprising, its brutal suppression, and its far-reaching political repercussions in Hungary and neighboring Eastern Bloc countries. He draws upon exclusive interviews with Russian and former KGB officials, survivors of the Soviet backlash, and relatives of those executed. He reveals new evidence from closed tribunals and documents kept secret in Soviet and Hungarian archives. Lendvai's breathtaking narrative shows how the uprising, while tragic, delivered a stunning blow to Communism that helped to ultimately bring about its demise. One Day That Shook the Communist World is the best account of these unprecedented events.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Based on his own experiences, Lendvai adds a sharp focus to understanding of one of the most important events of the 20th century, the spontaneous Hungarian uprising. He maintains a balanced account of the causes and consequences of this heroic but tragic revolt, including the nonassistance of the Western nations, especially the US. He is not as harshly critical as Charles Gati is in Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt (CH, Mar'07, 44-4018). Lendvai also gives a fresh perspective to the second revolution. In January 1957, he escaped to Austria where his work as an Austrian journalist and television commentator enabled him to continue to report on Hungarian affairs. The 50th anniversary of the uprising has seen publication of numerous books in Hungarian and English, e.g., Twelve Days: The Story of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution by Victor Sebestyen (CH, Sep'07, 45-0462a). Lendvai has written numerous books on Central Europe and Hungary, including The Hungarians: A Thousand Years of Victory in Defeat (CH, Dec'03, 41-2342). Summing Up: Recommended. College, university, and large public libraries. T. M. Racz emerita, Eastern Michigan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Paul Lendvai is a leading European journalist and senior commentator on Austrian television. He is editor in chief of the Vienna-based international quarterly Europäische Rundschau . He is the author of thirteen books, including The Hungarians: A Thousand Years of Victory in Defeat (Princeton).

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