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Places of Their Own : African American Suburbanization in the Twentieth Century

By: Wiese, Andrew.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Historical Studies of Urban America: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (425 p.).ISBN: 9780226896267.Subject(s): African Americans -- Economic conditions -- 20th century | African Americans - Social conditions - 20th century | Suburban African Americans -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Suburbanites -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Suburbanites - United States - History - 20th century | Suburbs -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Suburbs - United States - History - 20th century | United States -- Social conditions -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Places of Their Own : African American Suburbanization in the Twentieth CenturyDDC classification: 307.74/089/96073 | 307.7408996073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Outskirts of Town: The Geography of Black Suburbanization Before 1940; 2. ""Who Set You Flowin'?"": The Great Migration, Race, and Work in the Suburbs; 3. Places of Their Own: An African American Suburban Dream; 4. "Forbidden Neighbors": White Racism and Black Suburbanites, 1940-1960; 5. Driving a Wedge of Opportunity: Black Suburbanization in the North and West, 1940-1960; 6. "The House I Live In": Race, Class, and Suburban Dreams in the Postwar Period; 7. Separate Suburbanization in the South, 1940-1960
8. Something Old, Something New: Suburbanization in the Civil Rights Era, 1960-19809. The Next Great Migration: African American Suburbanization in the 1980s and 1990s; Notes; Index
Summary: On Melbenan Drive just west of Atlanta, sunlight falls onto a long row of well-kept lawns. Two dozen homes line the street; behind them wooden decks and living-room windows open onto vast woodland properties. Residents returning from their jobs steer SUVs into long driveways and emerge from their automobiles. They walk to the front doors of their houses past sculptured bushes and flowers in bloom.For most people, this cozy image of suburbia does not immediately evoke images of African Americans. But as this pioneering work demonstrates, the suburbs have provided a home to black re
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.86 W547 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=665712 Available EBL665712

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Outskirts of Town: The Geography of Black Suburbanization Before 1940; 2. ""Who Set You Flowin'?"": The Great Migration, Race, and Work in the Suburbs; 3. Places of Their Own: An African American Suburban Dream; 4. "Forbidden Neighbors": White Racism and Black Suburbanites, 1940-1960; 5. Driving a Wedge of Opportunity: Black Suburbanization in the North and West, 1940-1960; 6. "The House I Live In": Race, Class, and Suburban Dreams in the Postwar Period; 7. Separate Suburbanization in the South, 1940-1960

8. Something Old, Something New: Suburbanization in the Civil Rights Era, 1960-19809. The Next Great Migration: African American Suburbanization in the 1980s and 1990s; Notes; Index

On Melbenan Drive just west of Atlanta, sunlight falls onto a long row of well-kept lawns. Two dozen homes line the street; behind them wooden decks and living-room windows open onto vast woodland properties. Residents returning from their jobs steer SUVs into long driveways and emerge from their automobiles. They walk to the front doors of their houses past sculptured bushes and flowers in bloom.For most people, this cozy image of suburbia does not immediately evoke images of African Americans. But as this pioneering work demonstrates, the suburbs have provided a home to black re

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Numerous authors have detailed the phenomenon of black suburbanization in the 20th century surrounding specific U.S. cities, but Wiese (history, San Diego State Univ.) is one of the few to consider the overall trend, particularly comparing migration in the North and the South. Wiese argues that instead of being forced from the cities, blacks moved into the suburbs by choice in order to build their own communities. His discussion of Southern suburbanization is especially interesting, partly because earlier studies have focused on Northern cities and partly because Wiese sees suburbanization as an extension of the Civil Rights Movement's impetus toward black empowerment. Black-and-white illustrations and some charts complement the text. Although not every story could be told here, Wiese does a good job of covering his topic from both black and white perspectives. A useful addition to the literature of black suburbanization, which includes Valerie Johnson's Black Power in the Suburbs and Bruce Haynes's Red Lines, Black Spaces. Highly recommended for urban and African American studies collections.-Anthony J. Adam, Prairie View A&M Univ. Lib., TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Nothing so characterizes late 20th-century US demography as the impact of mass suburbanization. For African Americans, however, the movement to the suburbs has come in the face of fierce white resistance and historically entrenched economic barriers. Nonetheless, some nine million blacks moved to the suburbs after WW II. That movement, as Wiese (San Diego State Univ.) notes, rivals in size and scope the exodus of rural southern blacks earlier in the 20th century. He believes that this phenomenon is "an indispensable context for the study of African American life," and is one of the preconditions for sustaining the emerging and potent African American middle class. Wiese compares historic suburbanization patterns in both northern and southern urban areas, noting that despite encountering institutionalized and extralegal racial discrimination, blacks have created predominately affluent neighborhoods in and around Atlanta, Chicago, and Washington, D.C., among others. This book, part of the "Historical Studies of Urban America" series, supplements a growing number of published urban case studies. Some photos and maps. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Libraries specializing in cultural geography, African American history, sociology, and urban planning; upper-division undergraduates and above. K. Edgerton Montana State University at Billings

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