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The Depression Comes to the South Side : Protest and Politics in the Black Metropolis, 1930-1933

By: Reed, Christopher Robert.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Blacks in the Diaspora: Publisher: Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (205 p.).ISBN: 9780253005526.Subject(s): African Americans --Civil rights --Illinois --Chicago --History --20th century | African Americans --Illinois --Chicago --Politics and government --20th century | African Americans --Illinois --Chicago --Social conditions --20th century | Chicago (Ill.) --Politics and government --20th century | Chicago (Ill.) --Social conditions --20th century | Depressions --1929 --Illinois --Chicago --Social aspects | South Chicago (Ill.) --Politics and government --20th century | South Chicago (Ill.) --Social conditions --20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Depression Comes to the South Side : Protest and Politics in the Black Metropolis, 1930-1933DDC classification: 323.1196/073077311 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Introduction; 1. The Impact of the Depression on Home Life, Institutions, and Organizations; 2. The Ineffectiveness of Conventional Politics; 3. Protest Activism in the Streets: An Alternative to Conventional Politics; 4. Organized Protest Responses-From Militant to Revolutionary; 5. Organized Efforts in Behalf of Civil Rights; 6. Cultural Stirrings and Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In the 1920s, the South Side was looked on as the new Black Metropolis, but by the turn of the decade that vision was already in decline-a victim of the Depression. In this timely book, Christopher Robert Reed explores early Depression-era politics on Chicago's South Side. The economic crisis caused diverse responses from groups in the black community, distinguished by their political ideologies and stated goals. Some favored government intervention, others reform of social services. Some found expression in mass street demonstrations, militant advocacy of expanded civil rights, or revoluti
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F548.9.N4R444 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=670308 Available EBL670308

Cover; Contents; Preface; Introduction; 1. The Impact of the Depression on Home Life, Institutions, and Organizations; 2. The Ineffectiveness of Conventional Politics; 3. Protest Activism in the Streets: An Alternative to Conventional Politics; 4. Organized Protest Responses-From Militant to Revolutionary; 5. Organized Efforts in Behalf of Civil Rights; 6. Cultural Stirrings and Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In the 1920s, the South Side was looked on as the new Black Metropolis, but by the turn of the decade that vision was already in decline-a victim of the Depression. In this timely book, Christopher Robert Reed explores early Depression-era politics on Chicago's South Side. The economic crisis caused diverse responses from groups in the black community, distinguished by their political ideologies and stated goals. Some favored government intervention, others reform of social services. Some found expression in mass street demonstrations, militant advocacy of expanded civil rights, or revoluti

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Christopher Robert Reed is Professor Emeritus of History at Roosevelt University in Chicago and author of The Emergence of the Black Metropolis, 1910-1933; Black Chicago's First Century, 1833-1900; All the World Is Here: The Black Presence at White City (IUP, 2000); and The Chicago NAACP and the Rise of Black Professional Leadership (IUP, 1997).</p>

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