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Land of Hope : Chicago, Black Southerners, and the Great Migration

By: Grossman, James R.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (400 p.).ISBN: 9780226309965.Subject(s): African Americans - Illinois - Chicago - History - 20th century | African Americans -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century | African Americans - Southern States - Migrations - History - 20th century | African Americans -- Southern States -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century | Chicago (Ill.) -- History -- 1875- | Chicago (Ill.) - History - 1875- | Migration, Internal - United States - History - 20th century | Migration, Internal -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Land of Hope : Chicago, Black Southerners, and the Great MigrationDDC classification: 977.3/1100496073 | 977.304200496073 | 977.31100496 LOC classification: F548.9.N4 | G767 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part 1; 1. ""All I Ask Is Give Me a Chance""; 2. ""The Negro's Natural Home""; 3. ""Tell Me about the Place""; 4. ""Bound for the Promised Land ""; Part 2; 5. ""Home People"" and ""Old Settlers""; 6. ""Don't Have to Look up to the White Man""; 7. ""Eny Kind of Worke""; 8. ""The White Man's Union""; 9. ""What Work Can I Get If I Go through School?""; Conclusion; Appendix A; Appendix B; List of Abbreviations; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index
Summary: Grossman's rich, detailed analysis of black migration to Chicago during World War I and its aftermath brilliantly captures the cultural meaning of the movement.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F548.9.N4 G767 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=672978 Available EBL672978

Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part 1; 1. ""All I Ask Is Give Me a Chance""; 2. ""The Negro's Natural Home""; 3. ""Tell Me about the Place""; 4. ""Bound for the Promised Land ""; Part 2; 5. ""Home People"" and ""Old Settlers""; 6. ""Don't Have to Look up to the White Man""; 7. ""Eny Kind of Worke""; 8. ""The White Man's Union""; 9. ""What Work Can I Get If I Go through School?""; Conclusion; Appendix A; Appendix B; List of Abbreviations; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index

Grossman's rich, detailed analysis of black migration to Chicago during World War I and its aftermath brilliantly captures the cultural meaning of the movement.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With this well-researched and beautifully written study, Grossman makes an important contribution to scholarship on black migration to Chicago around the time of WW I. Grossman shows how resistance to southern racism laid the groundwork for the migration even before war production needs created the demand for labor that made the move financially viable. He stresses the key role of institutions within the black community (especially the Chicago Defender and informal social networks) that spread information about the attractions of Chicago and encouraged southern blacks to leave home. In this way, Grossman demonstrates that what previous scholars have considered to be a leaderless and disorganized movement was in actuality guided by a complex network of social institutions, individual decisions, and grass-roots leaders. In the second half of the book, Grossman concentrates on the community that southern blacks found--and helped to shape--in Chicago. He details cultural changes by looking closely at schools, work sites, politics, and public contacts between whites and blacks. The book succeeds in telling the story of the "great migration," and it also illumines other important aspects of the community whose initiative and imagination it describes. College and university libraries. -G. Lipsitz, University of Minnesota

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