Slavery in the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1787-1865 : A History of Human Bondage in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin

By: Lehman, Christopher PMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Jefferson : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2011Description: 1 online resource (229 p.)ISBN: 9780786485895Subject(s): Middle West -- Politics and government -- 19th century | Middle West -- Race relations -- History -- 19th century | Middle West -- Social conditions -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Middle West -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- United States -- Extension to the territoriesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Slavery in the Upper Mississippi Valley, 1787-1865 : A History of Human Bondage in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and WisconsinDDC classification: 305.800977 LOC classification: E415.7 .L44 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One: Slavery in the Northwest Territory; Chapter Two: The Politics of Indentured Servitude; Chapter Three: Miners and Soldiers; Chapter Four: Migrating Southerners; Chapter Five: Hoteliers and Local Slaveholders; Chapter Six: Dred Scott and the Boom in Upper Mississippi Slavery; Chapter Seven: Upper Mississippi Slavery in the Civil War Years; Conclusion; Chapter Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Ordinance in 1787 banned African American slavery in the Upper Mississippi River Valley, making the new territory officially ""free,"" slavery in fact persisted in the region through the end of the Civil War. Slaves accompanied presidential appointees serving as soldiers or federal officials in the Upper Mississippi, worked in federally supported mines, and openly accompanied southern travelers. Entrepreneurs from the East Coast started pro-slavery riverfront communities in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota to woo vacationing slaveholders. Midwestern slaves joined their southern counter
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E415.7 .L44 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=679311 Available EBL679311

Cover; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One: Slavery in the Northwest Territory; Chapter Two: The Politics of Indentured Servitude; Chapter Three: Miners and Soldiers; Chapter Four: Migrating Southerners; Chapter Five: Hoteliers and Local Slaveholders; Chapter Six: Dred Scott and the Boom in Upper Mississippi Slavery; Chapter Seven: Upper Mississippi Slavery in the Civil War Years; Conclusion; Chapter Notes; Bibliography; Index

Ordinance in 1787 banned African American slavery in the Upper Mississippi River Valley, making the new territory officially ""free,"" slavery in fact persisted in the region through the end of the Civil War. Slaves accompanied presidential appointees serving as soldiers or federal officials in the Upper Mississippi, worked in federally supported mines, and openly accompanied southern travelers. Entrepreneurs from the East Coast started pro-slavery riverfront communities in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota to woo vacationing slaveholders. Midwestern slaves joined their southern counter

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lehman (St. Cloud State Univ.) presents a comprehensive examination of slavery in the Upper Mississippi Valley from the Northwest Ordinance through the Civil War. One of the author's more intriguing points is that federal officials routinely ignored federal law and allowed slavery to persist in areas where it was banned. A refreshing feature is the inclusion of information about what happened to the slaves themselves. The work is missing some discussion of what Upper Mississippi slavery meant in the overall scheme of slavery and the debate over the institution. There is also more discussion on Minnesota than the other regions. The extensive bibliography will be of use to other scholars studying the region. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. K. L. Gorman Minnesota State University--Mankato

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christopher P. Lehman is a professor of ethnic studies at St. Cloud State University in St. Cloud, Minnesota, and the author of three books about American popular culture.

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